Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘poetry’

All the World a Poem gets a positive review from Ingram Library Services

Posted on November 7th, 2016 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2“A picture book of poetry for the very young takes the reader from butterfly wings to the sea, from grazing sheep to the stars above, and from the silence of the night to sharing with their best friend. Lyrics, some rhyming some not, bring wonder and beauty of nature to each page accompanied by light-hearted, earthen-toned paper collage illustrations. Tibo leaves the reader with the message, ‘If all the world is a poem, then anyone can be a poet!’ This title fits nicely into any poetry unit for early childhood and primary grades. Recommended for ages 5 to 8.”
—Jeanne Martin, M.Ed., Collection Development

Click here to read more reviews from Ingram Library Services

CM Magazine gives All the World a Poem a FOUR STAR rating!

Posted on September 30th, 2016 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2The greatest feat of this tribute to poetry is that Tibo has managed to illustrate that poetry is, essentially, everywhere. Equally impressive is his ability to place the profound next to the humourous

The accompanying paper collages created by graphic artist Manon Gauthier capture the wonder of the poems beautifully….their sense of whimsy will bring a smile to the reader’s face.

By bringing poetry to the level of children, All the World a Poem has succeeded in doing the impossible and in the process will certainly spark the imagination of future poets who are destined to write the “verses yet to come.”

Highly Recommended.

Click here to read the full review

All the World a Poem “celebrat[es] poetry as diverse as the poets who write it”

Posted on September 2nd, 2016 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2I am totally in love with All the World a Poem, a celebration of the poetry in the world and the world that’s in poetry, written by Gilles Tibo and illustrated by Manon Gauthier, both award-winners in Quebec and internationally. And now their book has been beautifully translated into English by Erin Woods, whose task fascinates me in what it means to translate a poem, poems being is so intrinsically about their language….

Each spread is a different poem celebrating poetry as diverse as the poets who write it, and sometime the poetry is literal (concrete?) and sometimes the poetry is simple (not simple) wonder at the world around one, ephemeral moments and fleeting flyaway things….

…The poems themselves all sophisticated and yet accessible, like the illustrations with their childlike renderings and the richness of texture. Inspiring young readers to see the poetry at work in life and the world, to read it, and maybe even to sit down and write it.

Click here for the full review.

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All the World a Poem an “engaging new picture book”—Quill & Quire

Posted on June 28th, 2016 by pajamapress

All the World a Poem by Gilles Tibo with illustrations by Manon Gauthier has received its first review from Quill & Quire.


AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2Gilles Tibo was already a well-loved children’s illustrator when he turned his hand to writing, and he has been prolific and successful in both fields. In his engaging new picture book, he celebrates his love of language and particularly the pleasures of writing poetry.

Tibo’s verses and prose poems (translated by Pajama Press managing editor Erin Woods) playfully consider the experience of poetry—how poems may climb under his quilt at night and keep him awake, or how writing poetry can resemble plucking silence like a flower and gently pressing it “into a notebook made of light.” Unexpected similes and metaphors help the reader see poems in many ways, linking them to nature, feelings and the joy in life.

While there is fun in a good—or a whole string of them—the figurative language is more effective than the rhymed verses. Certain concepts—including that poems “are infinite inside”—might be difficult for kids to comprehend, but the emphasis on sensations such as flying and floating, feelings of affection and companionship will bring the poems into relief for the young child hearing them.

The poetically quirky spirit of Tibo’s text is well served by the playful collage illustrations of Manon Gauthier. The text (sometimes running on an angle across the page) and images are placed in interesting and varied relationships, and Gauthier uses earthy colours and strong contrasts between white pages and patterned or dark backgrounds. The illustrations richly reflect the poems’ celebration of nature; of night with its associations of imagination and creativity; of the pleasures of poems that float in from the sea, drop from the sky or sprout from the earth for us to hold in our hearts.

Click here to read more reviews from Quill & Quire.

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Nat the Cat is “sure to win youngsters’ hearts”—School Library Journal

Posted on March 1st, 2014 by pajamapress

NatTheCat_Med“Nat, an orange tabby cat, spends his day sleeping in spite of the bustle going on around him. In fact, he can sleep anywhere–in drawers, on the stairs, even in a “cooking pot” or “flopping halfway off a shelf.” But “when the nighttime quiet falls,/when strange shadows fill the halls,/” Nat comes to life, joined by a black-and-white kitten. They careen around on toys, jump on beds, and enjoy the night sky perched on a window sill. Young readers will enjoy the brief rhymed text and find themselves chiming in on the repeated refrain, “Nat the cat can sleep like that!” And they will especially relish telling the unwritten story depicted in the large, mixed-media illustrations. In the three-quarter-page pictures that appear beneath the text, occasionally interspersed with double-page bleeds featuring close-ups of the two felines, the energetic kitten who plays with Nat at night tries repeatedly to rouse him during the day. He dangles string toys in front of the lazy cat’s face, rolls balls, plays the piano, tries to entice him with games–all to no avail. But whether sleeping or cavorting through the house, these two kitties are sure to win youngsters’ hearts.”

Click here to learn more about School Library Journal.

Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That is “just right”—Sal’s Fiction Addiction

Posted on December 31st, 2013 by pajamapress

NatTheCat_Med“…The text is just right for little ones, and for those wanting to read books on their own. It evokes movement, and typical feline behaviors. The mixed media artwork (pencil crayon, watercolor, gouache, acrylics and glaze) adds charm and delight to the reading. The bright colors and textured images are sure to interest young listeners, while adding a parallel story to the one told in words.

They are sure to want to hear it again and again. So, be prepared!”

Click here to read the full review.

Poetry Pet Peeves: 7 Dos and Don’ts when Rhyming for Children

Posted on September 17th, 2012 by pajamapress

PoetryPetPeeves

1. Don’t invert syntax for the sake of making a rhyme.

Unnatural phrases, don’t you see,

The end result of this must be!

2. Don’t add “do” before a verb to make the meter fit.

This error many folks do make.

It’s more than my poor ears can take.

3. Don’t strain the pronunciation of a word to make it rhyme. It must rhyme naturally from the last stressed syllable on.

It may look right, but I aver

The stress is inverted on answer.

4. Do have a story arc.

“The sun rose. It was lovely.” Well!

Do you have nothing more to tell?

5. Do avoid trite rhymes.

Breeze, trees. Dove, love. Sigh, cry. Go, fro. Night, tight. Song, along. Need I go on  (and on, and on)?

6. Do use internal rhyme, alliteration, and word play.

When you tickle the fancy and trip the tongue

It’s gear-turning, language-learning, wiggly, giggly fun!

7. Do use contemporary language, situations, and characters.

Perhaps in Queen Victoria’s reign

Their language was delightful,

But oh! to pen such words today

Is absolutely frightful.

Yes, carriages and pocketbooks

And parasols are grand,

But if you’d win your audience,

Examine what’s at hand.

If you ever want your book 

To make it off the shelf,

The child who reads your poetry 

Must recognize herself.