Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘canadian’

CM Magazine gives Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That a 4-star review

Posted on September 13th, 2013 by pajamapress

Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That will be available in Canada on September 15, 2013.

“Tara Anderson’s illustrations are whimsical and fun…Although the illustrations complement the story, they also tell a story on their own, encouraging children, and children and their grownups, to read the story again and again.

The mood of the book is playful, easily appealing to a preschool audience. Victoria Allenby’s title is a perfect choice for bedtime and storytimes for young children.

Highly recommended.

– Jill Griffith

Read the full review here.

CM Magazine recommends Tweezle into Everything

Posted on September 13th, 2013 by pajamapress

Tweezle into Everything is a great book for young children. It can be used to help young children who may be struggling with the challenges of not being able to do what older siblings can do, or for slightly older children who have younger siblings. The clear language and straightforward plot make it easily comprehendible for young children. Dean Griffiths has illustrated the book in bright, cheery colours that will appeal to young eyes and hold their attention. There is quite a bit of detail in the illustrations which can invite interaction with the storyteller and the child.

Overall, Tweezle into Everything would make a great addition to any bookshelf. It tackles the real-life issues of age and the challenges of birth order for both older and younger children, and it can be used as a great tool for teaching empathy.

Recommended.

— Rhiannon Jones

Read the full review here.

Graffiti Knight Book Trailer

Posted on September 6th, 2013 by pajamapress

Award-winning author Karen Bass brings readers a fast-paced story about a real-world era of censorship and struggle too often forgotten by history: Soviet-controlled post-World War II East Germany, where one boy fights for self-expression and the freedom to build his own future.

Watch Graffiti Knight Book Trailer

Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That “perfect for getting your own little ones to bed” — CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on September 3rd, 2013 by pajamapress

Tara Anderson[‘s illustrations]… demonstrate her knack for felines. Coupled with Victoria Allenby‘s simple but zippy rhyming story, Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That is a delightful read, perfect for getting your own little ones to bed, whether they be human or feline.”

— Helen Kubiw

Click here to read the full review.

Namesake is “captivating” —Ramblings of a Daydreamer

Posted on August 13th, 2013 by pajamapress

“…I thought MacLeod did a really good job of weaving the past together with the present. I always worry that books like this will get confusing with the back and forth, but I had no trouble keeping up with Namesake. I enjoyed watching Jane’s life in the present, and I eagerly anticipated each of her visits to the past, since I’ve always been fascinated with Tudor era England…Namesake is a captivating story that is sure to please fans of contemporary young adult and historic fiction alike.”

—Marie Landry

Click here to read the full review

Ten Stories Up wants you to read Emily For Real

Posted on June 13th, 2012 by pajamapress

I love books that remind me exactly what it felt like to be a teenager.  And books where guys and girls have relationships that aren’t about the luuuurve.  And books that have so much real-life drama that they don’t need magic and vampires and the end of the world (although I love those too).   Most of all, I love books that are sweet and funny and then kick you in the gut with totally poignant lines.

Emily For Real is all of those books at once.

–Lindsey Carmichael

Click here to read the full review

“Historical fiction with an ‘Aha!’ moment or two”CanLit for LittleCanadians reviews Acts of Courage

Posted on June 6th, 2012 by pajamapress

“By staying true to Laura’s undertaking while adding an interesting twist (fictional, of course), Connie Brummel Crook has taken this book from biography to historical fiction with an “Aha!” moment or two.

…[N]o subplot or component of the story is gratuitous, each important in explaining and moving the plot to Laura’s climactic walk, probably best described as a combination trudge, plod, wade, slog and creep.  Luckily Connie Brummel Crook’s telling of Laura Secord’s story lacks the toil and anguish of our heroine’s defining moment and instead takes the reader through Laura’s life’s journey to better understand the choices and connections she has made throughout.”

–Helen Kubiw

Click here to read the full review

CanLit for LittleCanadians praises Don’t Laugh at Giraffe

Posted on May 23rd, 2012 by pajamapress

Rebecca Bender‘s experiences in design and publishing (now as art director/designer at Pajama Press) have served her well, helping her create the touchable, plush animals that are Bird and Giraffe.  Bold acrylics fill the pages (try and find large sections of white anywhere) bringing the richness of the settings to act as companions for the distinct characters on which she focuses.  But Rebecca Bender goes beyond just drawing animals in bold colours:  she creates personalities with expressive visages (hard to do on a small bird) and morphologies, with lessons to teach and learn.  Recognizing that we’re all a little bit Giraffe and a little Bird makes them even more endearing.” –Helen Kubiw

Click here to read the full review.

Ten Stories Up calls True Blue”gritty and bitter and sensitive and unflinching”

Posted on April 23rd, 2012 by pajamapress

This is a beautiful book.  I don’t mean the story, but the package.  Congrats to the design department at Pajama Press: I was so busy admiring the fonts and running my fingers over the jacket that I almost forgot to read the book.  But I’m glad I did.

True Blue is not beautiful.  It’s gritty and bitter and sensitive and unflinching – both ripped from the headlines and totally unique.  The mystery kept me guessing, and the characters kept me up late…

…Casey, full of faith and confidence.  Stephanie, who annoyed me so much I caught myself thinking that Casey would have been totally justified in killing her.  The teacher, Miss Burke, whose courage had me in tears.  Jess’s mother, paralyzed by her own helplessness.  And complex, conflicted Jess, who wants something she can’t even identify, and resents Casey almost as much as she loves her.  Jess isn’t admirable, but she’s totally compelling.  These people are worth your time.

Click here to read the full review

Kirkus says Acts of Courage is great for American kids, too

Posted on April 16th, 2012 by pajamapress

Written from a Canadian perspective, this well-researched and -documented historical novel offers young readers a fascinating perspective on the events following the American Revolution and leading up to the War of 1812… The author tells a good story and presents some fascinating and little-known history (including such issues as slavery, economics, and social justice) in an interesting way. A historical note, sources and maps supplement the account. An opportunity for American children to see a little-known war through a rarely considered lens.