Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘young-adult’

Moon at Nine Shortlisted for the CLA Young Adult Book Award

Posted on March 8th, 2015 by pajamapress

MoonAtNine_C_Oct5.inddPajama Press congratulates Deborah Ellis, whose 2014 novel Moon at Nine has been shortlisted for the 2015 Canadian Library Association Young Adult Book Award.

Based closely on real events, Moon at Nine recounts the story of two teenaged girls who fell in love in 1980s Tehran. The moving novel has already been selected for the Amelia Bloomer Project List and as a Quill & Quire book of the year, an Ontario Library Association Best Bet, and a Best Books for Kids & Teens starred selection.

The CLA Young Adult Book Award is sponsored by TD Bank Group and Library Services Centre each year for a work of fiction that appeals to young adults between the ages of 13 and 18. The winner and honour books will be announced during the week of April 20th. The award will be presented during the CLA National Conference and Trade Show in Ottawa on June 4th.

Visit the Moon at Nine page to download a classroom discussion guide, find resources about Deborah Ellis, watch the official book trailer, or read full reviews.

Dance of the Banished “meticulously researched and sensitively written”—Urve Tamberg

Posted on September 3rd, 2014 by pajamapress

DanceOfTheBanished_HR_RGB“…Meticulously researched and sensitively written…In her nineteenth book, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch again gives a revealing and compassionate voice to an under-represented group of people, and shines a light on little-known events in history. Writing about historical injustices for young adults requires a solid grip of the events, sensitivity, and the ability to juggle multiple perspectives in order to create a compelling story that not only keeps us turning the pages, but also brings forward truths that may have been forgotten or buried. Dance of the Banished enlightens us about the plight of the Alevi Kurds during World War 1, saddens us as we find out about the massacre of the Armenians, and maybe even embarrasses us as we discover how “foreigners” were treated in Ontario. Her characters are human, and multifaceted, and make us think about how we would react in times of great stress if our homeland, families, or loved ones were in danger. The answers are never easy, and Marsha does not shy away from difficult and heart-wrenching choices.”

Click here to read the full review.

VOYA Reviews Graffiti Knight

Posted on August 15th, 2014 by pajamapress

GraffitiKnight_Med“In post-World War II Germany, Wilm is frustrated and bored, but he is better off than some who go hungry from too few Soviet rations. At first, Wilm’s only real worries are avoiding his drunken father and enduring boring mathematics lessons, until he finds out what really happened to his sister. They took his father’s leg in the war, and his dignity after, now they have taken his sister’s peace…

Graffiti Knight shines a light on an experience about which there is little information. Most World War II historical fiction focuses on the plight of those in concentration camps, but there is not much information on what it was like to live in Germany after the war or what it was like for the Germans themselves, Nazi or not. From the perspective of the occupied, readers will see through the eyes of the oppressed…it is a good addition to any library.”—Shanna Miles.

 

Plaque Unveiling and Book Launch for Dance of the Banished by Marsha Skrypuch

Posted on August 13th, 2014 by pajamapress

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49th Shelf features Moon at Nine in their August newsletter

Posted on August 5th, 2014 by pajamapress

MoonAtNine“In this third person rendition, Deborah Ellis creates characters that aren’t all loveable Ann[e] of Green Gable types. Farrin is a defiant perhaps selfish teen with a razor sharp mind who hates her mom. Besides writing stories, she has no goals until she meets Sadira, a kind and smart girl who comes to the aid of all…A story that illuminates, astounds and perhaps will grow empathy for other cultures and sexualities.”

Click here to read the full review.

Canadian Children’s Book News reviews “riveting” Moon at Nine

Posted on July 23rd, 2014 by pajamapress

MoonAtNine_C_Oct5.indd“Growing up in Tehran in the 1980s, Farrin’s entire life has always been filled with secrets. As secret supporters of the Shah who was overthrown by the Revolutionary Guard in 1979, Farrin’s parents’ illegal activities in support of the Shah could land them all in serious trouble. Her mother has always warned her not to draw attention to herself. Consequently, Farrin has never had close friends at school where she endeavours to keep a low profile. But everything changes when she meets a new girl named Sadira. Sadira’s friendship brings colour and brightness to her days, and soon Farrin knows that her feelings for Sadira are stronger than friendship. But this is Iran, and being gay is considered a crime. Farrin and Sadira cling to a desperate hope that the can somehow be together. But when the truth about their relationship is discovered, they are confronted with the harsh and terrible penalty that they must face for loving one another.

True to form, Deborah Ellis has crafted a stark, riveting and uncompromising account of life in a country and era that is markedly different from our own. Even the day-to-day details of Farrin’s life – the cruel, ever-suspicious school monitor always looking for an excuse to report her to the principal; her father’s driver stealing food from Farrin’s house to feed the other Afghan workers – create a strong sense of the political and religious climate of this time and place. Although the evolution of Farrin and Sadira’s relationship is not shown or explored in any real depth, their plight is nonetheless dramatically depicted. The strength of this novel is in its ability to highlight the social injustices that are still sadly present in our world today. Its heartbreaking and unflinching honestly will both engage readers and create heightened awareness.”

– Lisa Doucet

Learn more about Canadian Children’s Book News here.

Amy’s Marathon of Books reviews True Blue

Posted on July 22nd, 2014 by pajamapress

TrueBlue_Website“…what I liked about Ellis’ challenging character is that her actions made me think hard about how I would act in the same situation…I’d recommend True Blue for young to mid teen readers.”

Click here to read the full review.

Moon at Nine is certainly worth putting on your to-read list” – Amy’s Marathon of Books

Posted on July 21st, 2014 by pajamapress

MoonAtNine_C_Oct5.indd“Moon at Nine is quite frankly one of the most powerful love stories I have ever read, as Ellis shows her reader love is love, no matter what the sexual preference of those involved…With a backdrop of an almost post-war Iran, Farrin and Sadira are vibrant and inspiring characters consciously deciding to live in the moment by clinging to each other in the face of great opposition. Ellis’ writing is passionate and informative, creating a realistic and frightening picture of Iran’s reaction to homosexuality.

Moon at Nine is certainly worth putting on your to-read list.”

Click here to read the full review.

International Reading Association features Moon at Nine on Tales from Around the World

Posted on July 3rd, 2014 by pajamapress

MoonAtNine_C_Oct5.indd“…Adapted from a true story, this novel takes readers into intimate lives of same-sex relationships in a country which still enforces traditional and religious beliefs. While many places around the world are promoting gay rights and the legalization of same-sex marriage, there are still many places considering homosexuality an unspoken issue. This is a thought-provoking story inviting readers to ponder the interplay of cultural, moral, and sexual issues in different countries around the globe.”

Click here to read the full review.

Simcoe Reformer discusses Moon at Nine with Deborah Ellis

Posted on July 3rd, 2014 by pajamapress

“While the book covers a nationality and subject matter she hasn’t covered yet, it does have many of the same themes.

“I write about courage and how people find it,” said Ellis.

MoonAtNine_C_Oct5.indd

Ellis’ work often explores social justice and human rights.

She noted the issues explored in Moon at Nine will resonate with people in many countries.”

Click here to read the full article.