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Posts Tagged ‘remembrance-day’

Letters from WWI: Hustling for our Grub

Posted on November 1st, 2012 by pajamapress

Lieutenant Lawrence Browning Rogers, aged 37, travelled to the front lines of World War One as a medic in the Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles in 1915. He left behind his wife, May, his ten-year-old daughter, Aileen, and his seven-year-old son, Howard. The family exchanged hundreds of letters, many of which were kept by their descendents. This is one of them.

"The little ones", Aileen and Howard

“The little ones”, Aileen and Howard

Aug. 2, 1916

Dear May

I have just washed up my supper dishes – one plate, a cup and a spoon, so feel that I deserve a little leisure and cannot employ it better than writing home and letting you know that I am well.

There are two of us on this job in the medical hut and we get along fine. We have a little gasoline stove and cook our meals on it. We had some eggs, bread and butter and tea, then we managed to get a can of strawberry jam and our M.O. had a parcel sent him the other day and there was a tin of preserved cream in it, which he gave to us and we had that so we did not fare so badly.

Mind we don’t always live that way and there are times when we have to hustle for our grub. I got your parcel all okay and we were very glad to get it. The cake and candy was very acceptable.

I don’t know just when we are going to move again but I suppose it will be soon and then it will be to a new position but at present we cannot say for we don’t know.

I hope you can get an apartment in Westmount so the kiddies can go to school there. Things will right themselves. You know we have always put great faith in the Lord and everything has turned out all okay and I feel sure if we do the same now the Lord will take care of us.

It is wonderful to me to think of how well I have been and what I have gone through in these last 10 months and it’s certainly because a higher power is looking after and taking care of me.

All we can do now is to still put our faith to him and trust that all will come out all right. Kiss the little ones for me and lots of love for all from Daddy.

The Rogers family’s story is preserved in the picture book A Bear in War. For more information, including more letters, visit www.abearinwar.com.

Letters from WWI: Out of the Trenches

Posted on October 31st, 2012 by pajamapress

Lieutenant Lawrence Browning Rogers, aged 37, travelled to the front lines of World War One as a medic in the Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles in 1915. He left behind his wife, May, his ten-year-old daughter, Aileen, and his seven-year-old son, Howard. The family exchanged hundreds of letters, many of which were kept by their descendents. This is one of them.

A photo of Lawrence

A photo of Lawrence

April 8, 1916

Dear Girlie

I am out of the trenches again and not a bit sorry for it. I can assure you eight days is quite enough for one stretch. We expect to have eight days rest and then back in again. It is not so much the German shells or bullets that get my nerves, it is the awful sights I have to see and dress that is so hard.

I don’t need any money as I am able to make what we get here last from pay day to pay day. We get about $6 a month. The rest is put to our credit and we can draw it when we go on leave or it will be there when the war is over.

I hope to be able to get seven days leave in two or three weeks. I will go to London and visit Tom Richards’ mother and be able to see something of London.

I received the scarf Mrs. Oglivy knitted for me. It is very nice and was awfully kind of her to send. I will write to her when I finish this letter to you. We have had some lovely weather but the nights are cold and today is decidedly cold but it is a good April weather.

You know we all have to get old and I guess you will find a considerable change in me when I get back as this life tends to make us more serious than the ordinary life I used to live.

I always knew Howard was a good little fellow and also Aileen. All they want is a little understanding and no one can say why they are not the perfect gentleman and lady. Poor Aileen, her troubles are beginning but with a little teaching from you she will be able to understand and help herself out of trouble.

Today I saw some of those yellow flowers called marshmallows growing by a ditch. They looked fine and dandy.

Guess I have about run out of material so will have to end. Love to you all and don’t worry about me. Everything will come out ok in the end.

Yours lovingly,

Daddy

The Rogers family’s story is preserved in the picture book A Bear in War. For more information, including more letters, visit www.abearinwar.com. 

 

Letters from WWI: A Lot to be Thankful for

Posted on October 30th, 2012 by pajamapress

Lieutenant Lawrence Browning Rogers, aged 37, travelled to the front lines of World War One as a medic in the Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles in 1915. He left behind his wife, May, his ten-year-old daughter, Aileen, and his seven-year-old son, Howard. The family exchanged hundreds of letters, many of which were kept by their descendents. This is one of them.

May and Lawrence's wedding photo

May and Lawrence’s wedding photo

Caesar’s Camp
Oct. 21, 1915

Dear Girlie

I am so glad the children received the cards and liked them. It is so hard to find things to send them. I have sent you a photo registered and another little parcel also registered. Hope we will have better luck this time.

The holiday was not bad but it was not the nice bed that appealed to me, it was the nice, clean tablecloth and decent dishes and above all the difference in the people. You don’t know how much I miss seeing and talking to a real decent lady like Tom’s mother and aunt. That was far ahead of any soft bed. I am so used to sleeping on the hard wood that I don’t want a bed.

You say usually we were happy. If there was ever a minute when I have made you unhappy I don’t know how to express my sorrow for I know there were times when things were not going just as they ought to…I will try and make amends  when I get home again.

I wish you would not work so hard as I want to find my girlie when I get back not a shadow or a skeleton but at least looking like a living being. Glad you do go out and have company. It is the best thing for you.

You know I came over here to do my bit and it does not matter much to me how I do it, so long as I get the chance. Some of the fellows I am afraid have gotten cold feet and they are trying to back out as gracefully as possible.

Some of them admit that if they had not thought that the war would be over by now they would not have enlisted.

We have still a lot to be thankful for. I am still alive and well and as you have not said anything about anybody being sick I trust you are all the same as I am.

Will have to close now as we are terribly busy. Love to you all and do take a rest.

Yours lovingly,

Laurie

The Rogers family’s story is preserved in the picture book A Bear in War. For more information, including more letters, visit www.abearinwar.com. 

Letters from WWI:Daddy’s Chatterbox

Posted on October 29th, 2012 by pajamapress

Lieutenant Lawrence Browning Rogers, aged 37, travelled to the front lines of World War One as a medic in the Fifth Canadian Mounted Rifles in 1915. He left behind his wife, May, his ten-year-old daughter, Aileen, and his seven-year-old son, Howard. The family exchanged hundreds of letters, many of which were kept by their descendents. This is one of them.

Shorncliffe
Aug. 10, 1915

Dear Howard

Daddy misses that great old chatterbox more than he can tell and when I get home you can talk all you want and I guess I won’t feel like telling you to stop.

Aileen told me you had some furry little ducks. Take care of them.

Howard, May and Aileen

Howard, May and Aileen

Just now as I am writing this letter to you a flying machine is going over our camp. It is so close that we can almost see the man in it and it makes a noise just like a great big bee and goes very fast. Be a good boy and take Daddy’s place with mother and see that nothing happens to her. Just keep her safe for Daddy when he comes home.

I am sending a Three Penny to you. It is the kind of money we use over here and it is worth six cents in our money.

Good bye Sonny Jim. Lots of love and kisses for everybody from
Daddy

The Rogers family’s story is preserved in the picture book A Bear in War. For more information, including more letters, visit www.abearinwar.com.