Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘rainy-day’

A Good Day For Ducks is a “great read aloud for preschool groups or family time,” says Resource Links

Posted on December 5th, 2018 by pajamapress

Cover: A Good Day for Ducks Author: Jane Whittingham Illustrator: Noel Tuazon Publisher: Pajama PressResource Links

“With a large font format, plenty of onomatopoeia, and simple watercolour illustrations, this offering is a great read aloud for preschool groups or family time. The lovely depiction of a brother and sister who are close in age, and perfect companions, heartwarmingly shows a wonderful example of being content with simply playing in the rain, sharing a snuggly drink, and quietly drawing together.”

—Nicole Rowlinson

A Good Day For Ducks is “wonderfully rhythmic,” says Fab Book Reviews

Posted on December 3rd, 2018 by pajamapress

Cover: A Good Day for Ducks Author: Jane Whittingham Illustrator: Noel Tuazon Publisher: Pajama PressFab Book Reviews

“A Good Day for Ducks is the wonderfully rhythmic, sing-song tale of siblings who show readers just how best to enjoy the rain- and how to make the most of cozy and fun indoor activities after the rain….Readers will likely find much to love in the lightheartedness that A Good Day for Ducks offers. The combination of effective, chanting-like text (perfect short length for toddlers and up to appreciate!) with lovely, soft watercolor and ink drawings makes for another great picture book from the Canadian author and artist duo.”

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CM Magazine says A Good Day For Ducks would “make for a good bedtime story.”

Posted on December 2nd, 2018 by pajamapress

Cover: A Good Day for Ducks Author: Jane Whittingham Illustrator: Noel Tuazon Publisher: Pajama PressCM Magazine

“A Good Day for Ducks would make for a good bedtime story as it does not contain any sort of strong plot or exciting events. However, the basic storyline is likely relatable to the intended young audience.

The author selected basic sight words and includes lots of repetition throughout the story, making the book suitable for beginning readers. Children would likely pick up the vocabulary quickly after hearing it read aloud several times.”

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Sal’s Fiction Addiction says Under the Umbrella “is filled with an invitation to look at the world from point of view”

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“…March 1 – a ‘birth’ day of sorts for two new books from Pajama Press. The first of two new releases is about a very grumpy man….His surroundings are as grey and moody as he is. His mood is aptly displayed in the rhyming text and in the dreary darkness of the artwork.

That mood is effectively changed for the reader when we note a young boy looking at the warm glow emanating from a patisserie window. Bathed in yellow light, he is standing on tiptoe to get a clear look at the sweetness on display. A turn of the page and the reader is fully aware of the warmth the boy is feeling….

Just as quickly, with the strength of a gusty wind, we are returned to the gloom as the man loses his umbrella. Luckily, the boy is there to grab it, and to bring a welcome change to the man’s day.

The artwork beautifully matches the feel of the rainy day from two clearly different perspectives. Use of color, shape, and varying perspective add to the book’s appeal. The text is filled with an invitation to look at the world from point of view, and the translation to memorable rhyming text is a real plus!”

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Under the Umbrella is praised for the “great lesson in word choice” it offers by CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“If Under the Umbrella proves anything, it’s that there’s always a little sunshine associated with the gloominess of rain if you just open your eyes to see beyond the umbrellas….

Under the Umbrella was first published in French as Sous le parapluie (Les 400 coups, 2016) and garnered much attention for its simple but restorative story told with the pencil and gouache illustrations of Marion Arbona…Catherine Buquet’s text suggests a darkness to the man’s trek in the rain, using words like “grumbled”, “growled”, “muttered”, “attacked”, “forced”, and “With striding feet and stormy heart” (pg. 15), making it evident that the man’s mood is as foul as the weather. Yet when she introduces the boy who is “entranced” “at a warm and glowing window”…the atmosphere changes completely, though the rain continues to fall. What a great lesson in word choice for older readers and writers to witness the impact vocabulary has on atmosphere. Marion Arbona’s artwork conforms to that climate, using dusky greys and sharp angles for the dreary scenes while shining bright yellows and reds and pinks within the patisserie and then upon the two as they savour a shared treat. The interaction between the balding older man in the pin-striped suit and the little boy in cap and short pants is fleeting but colossal in its momentary importance. I’m glad the boy was taking the time to enjoy the visual display and that the man took the time to acknowledge the boy. It’s a small thing, but it’s a good thing.”

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