Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘francois-thisdale’

Canadian Bookworm calls A World of Kindness “a great addition to any collection”

Posted on September 20th, 2018 by pajamapress

Cover: A World of Kindness Author: The Editors & Illustrators of Pajama Press Publisher: Pajama Press“This book raises funds for Think Kindness and illustrates what kindness looks like….The pictures are well chosen to convey the actions, and show diversity. A great addition to any collection.”

Click here to read the full review

Pajama Press Celebrates Three Nominations with the OLA Forest of Reading Awards

Posted on October 16th, 2017 by pajamapress

Pajama Press is excited to announce that three of our titles have been nominated for the 2018 Ontario Library Association Forest of Reading® Awards.

FrenchToast_WebsiteFrench Toast, written by Kari-Lynn Winters and illustrated by François Thisdale, is a nominee for the Blue Spruce Award.

MacyMacMillan_WebsiteMacy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess, written by Shari Green, is a nominee for the Silver Birch Fiction Award. Click here to download the Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess teaching guide.

AdriftAtSea_websiteAdrift at Sea, written by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch with Tuan Ho, and illustrated by Brian Deines, is a nominee for the Golden Oak Award. Click here to download the Adrift at Sea teaching guide.

The Forest of Reading® is an initiative of the Ontario Library Association (OLA) that helps celebrate Canadian books, publishers, authors and illustrators. Every year, over 250,000 participants read a shortlist of books in their age category and vote for their favourites.

Pajama Press extends our congratulations to Kari-Lynn Winters, François Thisdale, Shari Green, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch, Tuan Ho, and Brian Deines. Our sincerest thanks go to the Ontario Library Association for promoting reading and Canadian books through this outstanding program.

Imagination Soup encourages French Toast as a “book to talk about differences, similarities, and kindness”

Posted on June 23rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“Phoebe’s grandmother, Nan-Ma, helps her talk out why the kids call her ‘French Toast’ then helps Phoebe celebrate her own skin tone as well as the variety of skin tones in her Jamaican, French-Canadian family using with beautiful food metaphors. Use this book to talk about differences, similarities, and kindness.”

Click here to read the full list “New Stories for the Readers on Your Lap”

French Toast received praise from Omnilibros for its “imaginative artwork”

Posted on May 24th, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“Phoebe, who is half Jamaican and half French-Canadian, hates when her classmates call her ‘French Toast.’…The imaginative artwork blends traditional drawing and painting with digital imagery using collage, acrylic, watercolor, and computer manipulation.”

Click here to read the full review

Youth Services Book Review says French Toast “would be a good addition to a multi-cultural library”

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_WebsiteRating: (1-5, 5 is an excellent or starred review) 4

What did you like about the book? This is a beautiful book about a little girl who is half Jamaican and half French Canadian….The illustrations are wonderful and the descriptions of the food are perfect.

Anything you didn’t like about it? I liked everything about this book.

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This is recommended for children ages 4-7. It would be a good addition to a multi-cultural library. Kindergarten children will also enjoy the story read aloud to them. It will stimulate discussion on race.

Who should buy this book? This would be good for elementary school libraries and public libraries that have a children’s section….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?  Yes”
Sandra Pacheco ESL teacher, Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full review

“The author [of French Toast] explains the concept of diversity in a positive life affirming way” says Resource Links

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“…A gentle loving explanation of how everyone has different skin tones expressed in warm delicious ways. Bullying is part of the story but Phoebe’s approach of not letting her bullies know that their nickname bothers her helps to defuse any power they have over her.

The illustrations are beautiful and the illustrator does beautiful portraits of his characters using digital media and acrylic….The author explains the concept of diversity in a positive life affirming way that children and adults will appreciate.”

Thematic Links: Grandmothers; Self-esteem; Bullying; Racially Mixed People; Identity; Diversity; Immigration; Blindness
—Isobel Lang

Read the full review on page 12 of the February 2017 issue of Resource Links

French Toast gets a positive review from The International Educator

Posted on February 21st, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light. …Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

The International Educator gives French Toast a positive review

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light.…Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

Read the full review on page 40 of the February 2017 issue of The International Educator

Winnipeg Free Press recommends French Toast as a gift for young readers this holiday season

Posted on December 16th, 2016 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“This is a delightful picture book from an Ontario writer that celebrates the joys of diversity….Montreal artist François Tisdale’s illustrations, in warm brown colours of honey and maple syrup, help make this little book delicious.”

Click here to read the full article

French Toast “feeds the spirit and bakes up multiple servings of compassion and open-mindedness” says CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on December 16th, 2016 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“…French Toast starts out as less about the food and more about labelling but Kari-Lynn Winters, with illustrator François Thisdale, turns the story around to be about the goodness of food and relationships that nourish us. Kari-Lynn Winters…impresses with her splendid foray into understanding and acceptance of skin colour, diversity and multiculturalism (Phoebe’s family is Haitian) and one that warms the heart and fills the belly with virtue and affection.

…François Thisdale, whose artwork is a magical blend of drawing and painting with digital imagery, balances the reality of Phoebe and her grandmother’s relationship and emotional situations with a dream-like landscape. His colours and textures fuse so many elements that the book becomes more art than merely a child’s picture book. And then there are the images of glorious food that cultivate nourishment for the soul, inspiring Phoebe and her grandmother, and anyone who reads the book, to see family and skin colour from a fresh perspective.

French toast may not be part of your holiday buffet but French Toast should definitely be on everyone’s bookshelf and story-telling list for the holidays and every day of the year when acceptance is vital i.e., always. It feeds the spirit and bakes up multiple servings of compassion and open-mindedness, helpings we should all scoop out enthusiastically.”

Click here to read the full review