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Archive for the ‘Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles’ Category

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is “just delightful” applauds Bookish Notions

Posted on October 11th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteRoot Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green is just delightful….Green’s writing has whimsy and heart…It makes you feel that, yes, miracles can happen in this place.

Bailey is a narrator I’m sure will resonate with young readers. She’s imaginative, kind and hopeful, and she stands up for what she believes is right….

Whimsical, hopeful and at times bittersweet, I highly recommend Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles.

Click here to read the full review.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is “highly recommended” by Barrie Summy

Posted on October 5th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteFirst off, can I just say that I’m in awe of anyone who can write a book in verse. And not just verse, but good verse. So, kudos to Shari Green!…

What I Loved: Well, lots of things! In no particular order, I loved the language….I loved how all the conflicts were not favorably resolved. Just like real life. I loved how island life (sea cave, ocean swimming, a dolphin, driftwood, and more) was a natural part of the story.

Highly recommended for the middle grader in your life.

Click here to read the full review.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles “is in itself a miracle” says CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on September 6th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteWith her parents’ marriage in need of repair, her friend and neighbour Daniel suffering with cystic fibrosis, a community divided and occasionally hostile, the compassionate Jasper being disgraced and driven out of town, and the church’s chalice missing, Bailey and Felicity Bay need a miracle or two.

…Good and bad may ebb and flow like the tides but that’s just the nature of things….Nonetheless it doesn’t stop her from making an all-out effort to help, whether it be her parents, Jasper, or a beached dolphin, and try to turn the tides of adversity.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is Shari Green’s debut novel but it is an accomplished story in form and content worthy of a seasoned writer….Balancing structure with plot is complicated. Yet Shari Green dives right in, creating characters and circumstances that effortlessly carry the reader from beginning to end on waves of sentiments, some fearful, most benevolent, all heartfelt. Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is in itself a miracle…

Click here for the full review.

Canadian Children’s Book News praises Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles

Posted on August 16th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteIn Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green, 11-year-old Bailey knows spending her first summer with Nana Marie is just one more sign of many that her parents’ marriage is in trouble. While they go on a retreat to try and salvage their relationship, Bailey and her younger brother, Kevin, are left to deal with the tension and fear of a possibly imminent divorce. Life in Felicity Bay challenges Bailey to look outside herself, however, when the local ice cream man, Jasper, makes a series of startling prophecies. Finding herself drawn into the heart of a town steeped in misery, Bailey keeps her faith in the goodness of others and looks for miracles to help heal the wounds of the past.

Writing in verse, Green aptly captures the journey of a girl faced with her first real heartbreak—the likely dissolution of her family. Bailey’s openness to confronting her reality while still believing in the extraordinary adds to her charm, as does her growing realization that heartache affects many others in her life as well. The colourful and mysterious small town of Felicity Bay and the ocean it borders offer the perfect backdrop for Bailey’s awakening to the larger world around her. With a renewed sense of connectedness and a greater understanding of family, Bailey emerges from her summer of change hopeful for the future.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles a “lovely and poignant novel”—School Library Journal

Posted on August 9th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteEleven-year-old Bailey keeps her eyes open for miracles. She and her younger brother, Kevin, are spending the summer with their grandmother while their parents are in a marriage counseling program. Bailey’s fear that her parents may separate along with concern about her new friend, Daniel, who has cystic fibrosis, leads her to look for magic in many forms—including a mermaid-shaped piece of driftwood that Bailey refers to as a “gift from the ocean.” Told in verse, Green’s writing captures the hopes of a young girl who is starting to recognize the complexity of relationships. Among Bailey’s new friends in Felicity Bay, a seaside Canadian town, is Jasper, a retired preacher who foresees that “a stranger from the sea will change everything.” Things do begin to change, most of all in Bailey’s life. When a chalice from the church goes missing and many of the townspeople suspect Jasper is the culprit, Bailey is determined to discover the truth. Along the way, Bailey learns important lessons about Felicity Bay that lead to healing between family members and friends and within herself. Dialogue written in italics, along with spacing between speakers, renders the narrative accessible and immediate to readers. Ultimately, Bailey makes peace with life’s inevitable challenges, and she recognizes that her time in Felicity Bay was indeed magical. VERDICT Recommend this lovely and poignant novel to middle grade readers who enjoy coming-of-age stories.

Click here to read more from School Library Journal.

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Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green receives its first review

Posted on May 13th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteRoot Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green, one of our upcoming Fall 2016 titles, has received its first review from CM Magazine.

“Told in verse-novel form, Green’s writing is captivatingly visual, with seamless inclusions of figurative language. As with many other verse-novels, a first-person narrative, told from the present tense, makes the story immediate and compelling…”Bev Brenna

Click here to read the full review.