Pajama Press

Archive for the ‘Hoogie In the Middle’ Category

Save the Date!

Posted on September 30th, 2013 by pajamapress

Word on the Street Toronto 2013

Posted on September 23rd, 2013 by pajamapress

Yesterday was the 24th annual Word on the Street festival, a day on which industry professionals and bibliophiles congregate to celebrate authors, illustrators and loads of books.

Pajama Press was well represented by Stephanie McLellan and Sue MacLeod, both of whom braved the chilly weather to read, discuss and sign their books.

A snapshot of the exciting lineup at the TD Children's Literature Tent

 

Stephanie McLellan reading Tweezle into Everything

 

Tweezle is a big boy!

 

The audience couldn't get enough of the monster siblings, Hoogie and Tweezle

 

Sue MacLeod reading an excerpt of Namesake

 

The audience came up with some insightful questions for the panel

 

Sue MacLeod explains how she got into writing YA - because Lady Jane Grey was a teen herself

 

Sue signs a book for a grateful fan

 
After a chilly but beautiful day, we’re looking forward to next year’s 25th anniversary edition!

Stephanie McLellan on the radio for Middle Child Day

Posted on August 23rd, 2013 by pajamapress

Did you know that Monday, August 12th was Middle Child Day? If you missed the occasion you can still celebrate by listening to some great middle child-themed radio.

Stephanie McLellan, author of Hoogie in the Middle, appeared on CBC’s  Metro Morning to talk about her book and about being a middle child. She was also interviewed on CBC’s Ontario Morning.

At Q107, Dominik Diamond, Ryan Parker, and Johnny Garbutt had a hilarious time reading Hoogie in the Middle and talking about it on the air.

And since every day is a good day to appreciate each other, why not show some love to a middle child in your life today? I’m sure they, like Hoogie, will feel “like the jelly in the middle of a donut…sweet.”

Resource Links praises Hoogie in the Middle

Posted on July 22nd, 2013 by pajamapress

“Not all children’s books need to be moralistic; some just express, simply and effectively, how it feels to be a child. Hoogie in the Middle is just such a book.

Hoogie might be in the middle of her monster family, but she is front and centre in this delightful picture book. Young readers caught in the middle like Hoogie will certainly identify; even their siblings will find themselves portrayed in positive ways in the pages. Hoogie is always caught in the middle, so much so that sometimes she ‘feels like the hole in the middle of a donut’: sadly invisible to all of her family. Eventually, her sadness becomes too much and ‘Hoogie… EXPLODES!’ Sometimes it takes a drastic reaction to get adults to notice…

Hoogie in the Middle does not condone loss of temper so much as present frustration as a real part of the childhood experience, as much as the imaginative play that Hoogie and her siblings engage in. The simple comparisons made between Hoogie, her older sister Pumpkin, and their baby brother Tweezle, are balanced and sufficiently repetitious to create a memorable, lilting narrative that will help young readers to learn the words as they go, or to enjoy the sounds as their parents read to them.

Combine Stephanie McLellan’s gentle and effective wordplay with Dean Griffiths’ fabulous, colourful illustrations, and you have a book that feels like Hoogie at the end: ‘like the jelly in the middle of a sandwich: Sweet.’”
—Karen Huenemann

Rated E: Excellent, enduring, everyone should see it!

Video interview with Stephanie McLellan

Posted on June 14th, 2013 by pajamapress

Stephanie McLellan is the author of Hoogie in the Middle, published in May, 2013 by Pajama Press. In this interview she talks about writing, family, and being a middle child.

Hoogie in the Middle is Highly Recommended—CM Magazine

Posted on May 17th, 2013 by pajamapress

“Stephanie McLellan, who has received numerous awards and nominations for her previous books, has created a charming text…Dean Griffiths, the prolific and popular award-winning illustrator of over twenty-five picture books, has provided readers with flamboyant full-page depictions of purple, green and blue monsters. The vigor and color are compelling, but it is the details that fascinate. Facial expressions and body language capture the confidence and joie-de-vivre of Pumpkin, the cuteness of Tweezle, and the angst of Hoogie. Both the humor and perceptiveness are endearing.

Hoogie in the Middle would make a great read-aloud for children aged three-seven, either in a group or individually. Middle siblings and monster lovers are among those who will especially relate to Hoogie.

Highly Recommended.”

Click here to read the full review.

Hoogie in the Middle Book Trailer

Posted on May 14th, 2013 by pajamapress

Hoogie in the Middle by Stephanie McLellan with illustrations by Dean Griffiths was released in Canada on May 1, 2013 (US publication forthcoming in August, 2013). Readers across the county are falling in love with the magenta middle monster who feels like the hole in the middle of a donut. But what is the real story behind Hoogie in the Middle? Click the link below to watch the trailer and find out.

Hoogie in the Middle Book Trailer

The Best Parts About Being a Middle Child

Posted on May 3rd, 2013 by pajamapress

On Wednesday, May 1 Pajama Press and Stephanie McLellan and Dean Griffiths published a book about me. It’s called Hoogie in the Middle. Two weeks ago I shared a bunch of pictures about The Worst Parts of Being a Middle Child. Today I’m sharing:

THE BEST PARTS OF BEING A MIDDLE CHILD

By Hoogie.

HoogieBest_BIG-AND-LITTLE HoogieBEST_BOTH WORLDS HoogieBEST_PURE ORIGINAL HoogieBEST_SECRETS HoogieBORN MEDIATOR

CanLit for LittleCanadians praises Hoogie In the Middle

Posted on April 24th, 2013 by pajamapress

“…While Stephanie McLellan’s text and Dean Griffith’s illustrations ensure that Mom and Dad are seen as engaged parents who really try to be there for all their children, it’s easy to understand how overwhelming it is to meet the needs of all of them, especially if their children may not be clear on what they need.  When Hoogie finally finds her voice and demands the attention of her parents, they immediately tell her and, best of all, show her that she is “the sun in the middle of the solar system” and the “pearl in the middle of the oyster.”  Hoogie and her parents may not know it but current research (Salmon and Schumann, 2011) suggests that, as a middle monster, Hoogie is learning the skills and strategies that will help her navigate adulthood successfully.  Stephanie McLellan and Dean Griffith probably didn’t even realize how successful they’d been in delivering that little message to little monsters and their parents everywhere.”—Helen K.

Click here to read the full review.

Sarah Ellis praises Hoogie in the Middle in Quill & Quire feature review

Posted on April 20th, 2013 by pajamapress

Brothers and Sisters: Two picture books touchingly explore sibling relationships through illustrations as strong as the text, writes Sarah Ellis

“Scene: Two children stand in the late afternoon sunlight comparing shadows. The little brother says, “Look! I’m long!” His older sister replies, “I’m longer.”

Siblings give us our first experience of the tyranny of comparison. Birth order programs us for life, and, in childhood, where you fit in is as obvious as your shoe size or those marks on the doorframe. It’s no wonder our position in the family is such a rich source of material for picture books.

Hoogie in the Middle, by Stephanie McLellan and illustrated by Dean Griffiths, features a family of benevolently hairy monsters who look like a cross between a domestic long-haired cat and one of Sendak’s wild things (the horned one in the striped pullover), resplendent in My Little Pony colours. Pumpkin, the eldest child, is blue like mom. Baby Tweezle is green like Dad, but middle child Hoogie is magenta, like herself. Hoogie feels ignored and neglected, neither as cute as Tweezle, nor as competent as Pumpkin. Finally she has a meltdown, and Dad and Mom helicopter in to comfort her.

This picture book is a terrific example of words and images doing their own job. The text gives us movement (as Pumpkin skips and Tweezle toddles), melody (as Hoogie whispers, “Too big. Too small. No room for me at all”), and, most of all, metaphor (“Sometimes Hoogie feels like the hole in the middle of a donut.”

The pictures carry the emotional weight. The composition of family scenes says it all: close pairings of parent and child leave Hoogie floating alone against a white background; Hoogie looks sideways across a double-page spread but nobody is looking back; her sister and brother are enclosed in circles and triangles while she’s isolated on a facing page.

Griffiths captures the body language of children (well, of childlike, horned, fanged, cat-like things) perfectly. The final spread shows Hoogie swinging between her parents’ hands, her posture a subtle combination of joy and tension, triumph and just a tiny bit of anger…”
Q&Q feature reviewer SARAH ELLIS is a Vancouver author and former librarian.