Pajama Press

Archive for the ‘Book Resources’ Category

Sun in My Tummy Teaching Guide

Posted on April 25th, 2022 by pajamapress

Click here to download the Sun in My Tummy teaching guide.

No More Plastic Extra Content

Posted on April 22nd, 2022 by pajamapress

Click here to see Storytime Trail and a message from Hon. Steven Guilbeault, Minister of Environment and Climate Change.

The U-nique Lou Fox Reviews

Posted on April 19th, 2022 by pajamapress

YA Books Central

“Appreciate those close to you. The author is able to evoke empathy for Louisa, as she becomes overwhelmed by the challenges faced every day. The plot isn’t overly complicated, but the feeling of normalcy helps to make the book approachable. This book became more than I expected, and I highly recommend you give it a shot.”

Click here to read the full review

CM Magazine

“Probably every family, and every teacher, knows a Louisa. ‘Louisa’ in our family (the name has been changed to protect the innocent) is every bit as fun and creative and caring as author Jodi Carmichael’s Louisa. And she struggles every bit as much as Louisa to focus and function in a school environment. Carmichael, who has ADHD herself, has created a totally believable character.

Our ‘Louisa’ loves to cook, and so it is a nice bonus that Carmichael has included a recipe at the back of the book for “Mom’s Tofu Chocolate Chip Cookies”. Carmichael also includes short descriptions and resources for more information on dyslexia and ADHD, as well as a message to her readers…I hope that every Louisa in every classroom gets an opportunity to read or listen to The U-nique Lou Fox. It will be wonderful for all Louisas to have their uniqueness recognized and affirmed. Highly Recommended”

Click here to read the full review

Rainy Days Extra Content

Posted on April 6th, 2022 by pajamapress

Click here to see Rainy Days on CTV Your Morning

Finding Moose Reviews

Posted on April 6th, 2022 by pajamapress

Youth Services Book Review

“A little boy narrates a walk in the woods with his grandpa. They find fresh moose droppings and walk softly in hopes of seeing a moose in person. They hear the call of a chickadee and the hammering of a woodpecker, and see a chipmunk and a beaver, but no moose. Along the way, Grandpa tells the boy the Ojibwemowin words for the animals and plants they find. Finally, just as they get home: “Mooz!”

This is a sweet tale of exploring nature with a grandparent, enriched by the grandfather’s observations and Ojibwemowin words. The boy and his grandfather present as indigenous people, adding to a growing number of children’s books which feature native cultures from around North America. Endpapers have a pictorial glossary, with English, Ojibwemowin and pronunciations.”

Click here to read the full review

Portland Book Review

“Sue Farrell Holler has written a sweet, quiet story of a grandfather introducing his grandson to the wonders of nature and teaching him the names of flora and fauna in both English and Ojibwemowin. Charming illustrations by Jennifer Faria are painted in gentle, soft colors, and they are filled with plenty of details to keep little eyes on the pages as the story is read to them. This is a lovely story that will become a favorite at reading time.”

Click here to read the full review

CM Magazine

“The illustrations are serene, detailed, and convey the crisp cold of the forest on this exploratory day. Faria utilizes textures and colour to bring the audience with the grandfather and his grandson as they go on their journey and to illuminate the movement of animals in the forest. Her illustrations also hold a surprise near the end.

Holler’s Finding Moose is an excellent addition to any bookshelf, especially for helping young learners learn a bit of the Ojibwemowin language. Lovers of nature, exploring, and spending time with dear loved ones will enjoy this story – it is a gem for all ages.

Highly Recommended

Click here to read the full review

CanLit for LittleCanadians

“Finding Moose is as contemplative and instructive as Sue Farrell Holler and Jennifer Faria’s earlier picture book. Sue Farrell Holler gives Grandpa the wisdom of age and experience and the boy that of fascination and connection. Together they experience nature fully but perhaps in different ways. A walk in the woods becomes a sensory adventure without the drama and high-octane action that can be tiresome and ephemeral. Instead, the two walk and look. They are one with each other and the world. That patience and calm is carried with Jennifer Faria’s illustrations. Her acrylic paintings are often reflective of a Woodland Art style (see the flowers in the illustration above), emphasizing line and shape and keeping the story grounded in tranquility and reality. Even her choice of colour expresses that oneness with nature, playing the browns and blues with occasional flashes of red or a shamrock green.”

Click here to read the full review

Simcoe.com

“I like children’s books that are both educational and show how wonderful nature is, so I was delighted with Finding Moose written by Sue Farrell Holler and beautifully illustrated by Jennifer Faria.

The story sees a young boy and his grandfather quietly go for a spring walk in the woods where they come across some moose poop on the trail. They look for the moose and find where he ate some branches for breakfast…Children will enjoy this simple story that introduces them to some of their forest neighbours whose names are in both English and Ojibwemowin. Highly recommended.”

Click here to read the full review

Finding Moose Teaching Guide

Posted on April 4th, 2022 by pajamapress

Click here to download the Finding Moose teaching guide.

The Undercover Book List Extra Content

Posted on April 4th, 2022 by pajamapress

A light-skinned girl with brown hair in a ponytail sits atop a cloud with a book in her lap and dozens of pieces of paper falling down from her cloud. Below her is a light-skinned boy with orange curly hair who is sitting atop some pillows, is also reading a book, and is receiving all pages that are cascading down on him.

Click here to download the Start Your Own Undercover Book Club Guide

Ballewiena Reviews

Posted on March 31st, 2022 by pajamapress

Kirkus Reviews

“For a dachshund with dancing feet, “sit” and “stay” are just so passé.

Possessed with the soul, if not the body, of a ballet dancer, Dotty would much rather pirouette and glissade down the sidewalk than heel like her polite poodle sisters Jazzebelle and Miffy—and so when her severe trainer Ms. Austere sends her to obedience school, she runs off in tears: “All I want to do is dance.” Despair is transformed to delight, however, after she meets Louis-Pierre, an acrobatic park squirrel whose offer to teach her a thing or two about training and discipline leaves her well prepared to walk onstage at the canine Golden Bow Talent Show and wow the crowd with her grand jeté and pas de chat.”

Click here to read the full review

Publishers Weekly

“Dotty meets a Balanchine-like squirrel, Louis-Pierre, who encourages her passion while demanding rigorous practice: “Look how much discipline you’ve gained, Pitou! The more focus you have, the better you dance.” This insistence on diligence and commitment propels Dotty to a triumphant performance at the dog talent show, which shows Ms. Austere the error of her ways, and infuses freshness into a familiar-feeling beat-of-one’s-own-drum story (Dotty even realizes why Ms. Austere’s other dogs practice unceasingly). The gouache, watercolor, pencil, ink, and digital illustrations brim with joie de vivre as the wiry pooch spins, leaps, and pursues her dream—readers may find themselves becoming budding balletomanes as the story unfolds.”

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Booklist

For readers who don’t speak French, the phonetic pronunciations of terms for basic ballet moves are readily available on the endpapers, along with drawings of tutu-clad dachshunds performing each action. The story is well paced, and the lively pictures, created with gouache, watercolor, ink, pencil, and digital elements, portray Dotty as a determined ballerina, performing impressive feats while balanced on her tiny yet strong back legs. A picture-book romp for children who dream of ballet.”

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Foreword Review

“In this inspiring tale, a dance-dazzled dachshund, Dotty, cannot resist mimicking the ballet moves she loves—even when her person, Ms. Austere, issues other commands; even when she’s out on walks among other, baffled dogs. Rendered in grayscale against Dotty’s colorful world, frustrated Ms. Austere boots Dotty off to obedience courses with similarly colorless rules.”

Click here to read the full review

Harvey Takes the Lead Reviews

Posted on March 31st, 2022 by pajamapress

Kirkus Reviews

“In the third series entry, Harvey, the West Highland white terrier; his young owner, Maggie; and her friend Austin confront drama and heartbreak.

Seventh grade pals Maggie and Austin, who volunteer at the Brayside Retirement Villa, meet Ms. Appleby, the facility’s strict new assistant director. She imposes draconian rules governing, among other things, visits by dogs. Additionally, Maggie’s dismayed she was overlooked for the lead in the school’s production of Annie, the role she coveted; she’s become the understudy instead. Besides that, Austin’s unemployed mom can’t afford his upcoming school trip. Brayside resident Mr. Kowalski faces the toughest struggle: His seriously ill wife has been hospitalized. Over time, he achieves emotional catharsis by recounting to sympathetic Austin some of his and Mrs. Kowalski’s World War II experiences. Meanwhile, Maggie puts her role in the play into perspective and befriends and supports the talented lead. In brief chapters this warm novel delivers well-realized characters and underscores connections that bind: those between animals and humans and those that unite generations.”

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CM Magazine

“Austin is embarrassed by his family’s lack of funds to enable him to attend the school trip, but he continues to channel his energies in a positive direction, particularly through his volunteering at the retirement home. Mr. Kowalski is sad that his wife of sixty years is very ill in the hospital, but Austin helps him to remember the pleasant memories and music of their earlier years. And Harvey continues to do what he does best: comforting the retirement home residents and searching for the source of the scent that he knows means mice. For the most part, the story strands move on separate tracks (chapters are narrated by Maggie, Austin, and Harvey) until the end when they are woven together in a satisfying conclusion. A welcome treat for Harvey fans and dog lovers everywhere. Highly Recommended”

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YA Books Central

“Kindness will be rewarded. The early parts of the book share a simple tale of two kids volunteering at a retirement village, but the plot slowly evolves into an emotional journey of hope, caring, and friendship. The story unites generations in a sensitive way, and I recommend you give it a shot.”

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Children’s Literature–CLCD

“Fans of the lovable and charming Harvey (a West Highland terrier) will be thrilled with his return. Maggie (Harvey’s owner) along Austin and the residents of Brayside Retirement Villa are back with new dilemmas. There’s a new assistant director at Brayside. She begins to enforce and dictate several rules; one regulation severely limits Harvey’s visits to everyone’s dismay. The Brayside residents along with the staff are extremely disappointed with the changes instigated by the assistant director in the guise of running a tight ship.”

Book Time

“The story is fast moving and the characters are strong. I am impressed by Maggie and Austin’s mature choices and I loved getting to learn about Mr. Kowalski’s life during the Secord World War. While you do not need to read Books 1 and 2 to understand what is going in Harvey Takes the Lead, I am going to suggest you may want to: the characters are great and I think the former books will provide more details about the crews’ backstories.”

Click here to read the full review

Storytime with Stephanie

“Colleen Nelson pours so much heart onto the pages of her Harvey stories and none more than in Harvey Takes the Lead. At a time when many seniors living facilities have been locked down and seniors have been allowed very few visitors, it’s a bright light to remind grandchildren about the importance of connections with grandparents and elders. There is tremendous love and respect not just for seniors but those who care for them as well and I love seeing how important the Brayside community is to Maggie and Austin.”

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Jill’s Book Blog

“The issues at the retirement home were an important part of this story. The new assistant director thought she was doing the right thing by restricting Harvey’s visits and banning activities for the residents. However, these were things that they looked forward to, so it actually hurt their quality of life. I saw first hand at my grandmother’s nursing home how music and dogs can brighten up the residents. There were even non-verbal residents who would speak when they saw dogs or heard certain songs. I’m glad this was part of a children’s book, so they can learn about life in a retirement home.

Harvey Takes the Lead is another wonderful Harvey story!”

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Room for More Reviews

Posted on March 31st, 2022 by pajamapress

Kirkus Reviews

“Over the objections of Scratch, the more timorous of the two, Dig invites first a fleeing wallaby and her joey, then a koala with burned paws, and, scariest of all, a venomous tiger snake into the increasingly crowded burrow to escape the flames and smoke above. The wombats’ kindness is rewarded when the rains that come to douse the fire threaten to flood the burrow and the grateful visitors pitch in to build a barricade. “Aren’t we clever,” says Scratch afterward, “to have invited the neighbors into our home?” “Yes,” agrees Dig, viewing things from a more perceptive angle. “We are very lucky.”

Click here to read the full review