Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘verse-form-novel’

Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess receives praise from Becky’s Book Review for “wonderful” characterization

Posted on December 9th, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“My thoughts: I loved this one. I really liked Macy. But I loved, loved, loved Iris. Together these two make for a GREAT read. I also enjoyed the other characters in the book. (Her best friend, Olivia, her mother, her step-father-to-be, Alan, her step-sisters-to-be, Kaitlin and Bethany.) Macy is a flawed heroine–my favorite kind. So in terms of characterization, this one was wonderful. The language–the writing–was great….I would say the writing was lyrical and poetic in places.”

Click here to read the full review

Kids’ BookBuzz reviewer Hannah, age 9, “loved” Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess

Posted on August 11th, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“I loved this book because it was written in free-verse poetry, which made it a more interesting and fun read. I felt that this book had the wonderful message that you can always find something good in life, no matter what happens! I would recommend it for kids ten and up!”
—Hannah, Age 9

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The Horn Book Magazine calls Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess “a

Posted on August 1st, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“Green’s free verse makes this a quick, accessible read, focusing on Macy’s realistic reluctance to share her mother and her gradual acceptance of the changes in her life (“Babysitting was actually okay / but I can’t imagine / a lifetime of it,” she comments feelingly). Macy’s deafness is a feature but not the focus of this…sympathetic rendering of a twelve-year-old’s angst.”
—Deirdre F. Baker

Read the full review in the September/October 2017 issue of The Horn Book Magazine

My Comfy Chair calls Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles “a wonderful, poignant book”

Posted on June 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_Website“I’m very excited to offer a wonderful, poignant book in verse for Marvelous Middle Grade Monday….

The story is lovely, and winds up in a beautiful way with Bailey discovering that sometimes you have to make your own miracles, and that sometimes even miracles aren’t enough. But through the sadness and joy, Bailey remains optimistic, and discovers that families always love each other, even when it is hard to get along.

I strongly recommend this to all who love the sea, and families, and miracles. And even root beer candy.

Five stars out of five!”

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The Write Stuff says “don’t miss [Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles]”

Posted on June 16th, 2017 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_Website“Author Shari Green has pulled off a terrific feat. She writes this affecting book in first person point of view in young Bailey’s voice in beautiful, lyrical blank verse — and it works seamlessly. The voice is pitch perfect for a young girl, the characters are all fully developed and completely believable, and the story will leave readers deeply moved and wanting more. This lovely book deserves a far wider readership than the middle-grade audience to which it is being marketed. Don’t miss this one.”

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Literary Locker says Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is “a truly incredible beach read”

Posted on June 15th, 2017 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_Website“Heart-wrenching, powerful, memorable! This book is sure to win its way into the hearts of so many young readers.”

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Resource Links calls Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess “a beautifully emotional, poetic treasure”

Posted on June 12th, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“This deceptively simple novel-in-verse is a beautifully emotional, poetic treasure. Shari Green’s writing is captivating and she has created, in Macy McMillan, a complex, true-to-life, sensitive preteen girl….

This is the type of book readers will find themselves reading cover to cover in a single sitting, and since it is written in verse, that is entirely possible. Green’s writing is superbly lyrical, touching, and likely to stick with readers for a long time….

More than once, I found myself thinking of Eleanor Estes’ classic The Hundred Dresses. While the gut-wrenchingly sad undertones of that novel are quite different from this one, both invoked strong emotions in me, and both feature similar themes of a young girl coping with extreme challenges – Macy with her disability, and the other novel’s protagonist with unbearable poverty. This novel, however, is emotionally powerful without being morose. It is simply real, and its message of accepting true happiness and living life to the fullest is beautiful and inspiring.

Highly recommended for all children’s libraries.”

Thematic Links: Deaf Children; Stepfamilies; Friendship; Elderly People; Novels in Verse; Realistic Fiction; Grief; Fitting In
Nicole Rowlinson

Read the full review on page 12 of the June 2017 issue of Resource Links

Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess is “clever, engaging, and accessible” says School Library Journal

Posted on May 25th, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“The novel-in-verse structure is clever, engaging, and accessible. Macy’s deafness is skillfully woven into the story, adding depth and complexity to her characterization and relationships with others….With candor and angst, Macy shares her sorrow over an argument with her best friend, her desire to stop her mother from getting married, her determination not to like her stepfather, and her affection for aging Iris. VERDICT Macy’s coming-of-age anxieties, observations, and insights will resonate with middle grade readers. A strong purchase for public and school libraries.”
—Gerry Larson, formerly at Durham School of the Arts, NC

Click here to read the full review

Kirkus Reviews calls Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess a “powerful tale”

Posted on March 29th, 2017 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_Website“Macy, a deaf sixth-grader who attends a mainstream school with an interpreter, faces enormous challenges, as her mother will soon marry, necessitating a move to her new stepdad’s house. Macy and her mother have always been a team of just two; adding Alan and his twin daughters is scary and distressing….The verse trails down the pages in narrow bands leaving plenty of white space. Even characters that are barely sketched emerge fully realized through the spare yet poignant narrative….When one twin endearingly makes the sign ‘sister’ to Macy, it’s an affecting moment of deep promise. Macy’s life lessons are realistic and illuminating; that she is deaf adds yet another dimension to an already powerful tale. (Fiction. 9-12)”

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Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles gets 4 out of 5 stars from Moon Shine Art Spot

Posted on January 24th, 2017 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_Website“My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This book offers a peak inside a child’s mind. The questions a child must have about parents and a failing marriage. Still young enough to believe in magic and miracles, but too young to fully understand marriage, the reality of divorce, or the ailments of the human body.

A dream for better things and hope of understanding that “leaving” doesn’t mean someone doesn’t still love you.

I loved the cover art. I chose the book based solely on the title and cover art. I was surprised by the story when I started reading it. I was expecting summer fun, beaches, candy, and all things happy-happy. That’s not this book. It had everything except the happy-happy.

For any child reading the story, it is a way to gently explore some of the changes many children face today. I think the author did a great job with the story….”
—Aunt Meanie

Click here to read the full review