Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘sturdy-format-books’

The Where’s Bunny? bedtime checklist is “helpful” says Resource Links Magazine

Posted on April 27th, 2018 by pajamapress

Cover: Where's Bunny? Author: Theo Heras Illustrator: Renné Benoit Publisher: Pajama Press“A book on bedtime routines….This book is helpful with a bedtime checklist that could have parents of young children establishing their own bedtime routine.”
—Holly Rainville

Read the full review on page 6 of the April 2018 issue of Resource Links Magazine

Wild One gets a rating of 5/5 from Kids’ BookBuzz reviewer, Lena

Posted on April 4th, 2018 by pajamapress

WildOne_Website“We rated this book: [5/5] Wild One is a rhyming picture book for bedtime….The book is fun to read to yourself, and the words are easy, and it’s probably a good book for a parent to read to a little child because of the rhymes and rhythmic repetition of ‘wild one’ at the beginning of every sentence. The illustrations are cute and colorfully painted with watercolors….Any beginning reader who likes animals and likes to play outside will enjoy this book.”
—Lena, Age 9

Click here to read the full review

Midwest Book Review says Baby Cakes “is especially recommended for children ages 1 to 3″

Posted on February 7th, 2018 by pajamapress

BabyCakes_Website“Told in simple text by Theo Heras, charmingly illustrated on every page by Renne Benoit, and delivered in a sturdy, padded cover with stronger pages that are perfect for little hands, Baby Cakes…is especially recommended for children ages 1 to 3, making it appropriate for family, daycare center, preschool, and community library collections.”

Click here to read the full review

Kirkus Review calls Where's Bunny? “A nicely child-centered iteration on a common theme”

Posted on February 6th, 2018 by pajamapress

WheresBunny_Website“The sibling pair that last made Baby Cakes (2017) now walk themselves through a bedtime routine….As in the prior book, the pictures’ focus is on the children, both brown-skinned and with straight, black hair. The brown-skinned adult hands that place the toddler in the bath and then lift the tot back out make it clear that the children are being lovingly supervised, but the visual centering of the children allows for fluid reading of the text….[R]eaders may well see a newly literate older sibling reading aloud to a younger one—an empowering possibility….A nicely child-centered iteration on a common theme. (Picture book. 2-5)”

Click here to read the full review