Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘picture-books’

Sal’s Fiction Addiction says “Celia Godkin does a truly admirable job of presenting the [Yellowstone Park] project” in The Wolves Return

Posted on June 28th, 2017 by pajamapress

thewolvesreturn_website“Celia Godkin does a truly admirable job of presenting the [Yellowstone Park] project in terms children will understand. The language is clear, the telling is positive and brings awareness for the remarkable results….

Those changes are portrayed in detailed mixed media artwork. The double page spreads clearly show the park and its dramatic change – all through the introduction of the gray wolf. The settings beautifully display the grandeur of the park, and the interdependence of the species living there. Don’t miss having a close look at the endpapers. The illustrations there may result in further research for interested children.

Written for a younger audience, it will have impact for older readers as well. While much is learned about biodiversity and the environment, it is presented in a most appealing format. Never did I feel that it was written to teach me something. It is simply a story of life in a very special environment.”

Click here to read the full review

After reading The Wolves Return, Kids’ BookBuzz reviewer Jewel wants to “read other books by [Celia Godkin]“

Posted on June 27th, 2017 by pajamapress

thewolvesreturn_website“We rated this book: [4.5/5]…

I loved The Wolves Return. I visited Yellowstone a few years ago and got to see all different kinds wildlife: black bears, grizzlies, bison, eagles, foxes, and elk. I think it was a good idea for Canada to give some wolves to Yellowstone or they wouldn’t have wolves to balance the elk herds. I loved the illustrations because they looked so real and had a lot of details. The author is also the illustrator. I would like to read other books by this author.”
—Jewel – Age 9

Click here to read the full review

Imagination Soup included How Do You Feel? in their list of “Picture Books You Can Use for Writing Prompts”

Posted on June 25th, 2017 by pajamapress

HowDoYouFeel_website“This is a literal (tactile) feelings book with lots of beautiful similes. Toad feels bumpy like the trunk of a gnarly tree. Duckling feels fuzzy like tall grass reaching for the sun. Rabbit feels silky like a web carefully spun. Use this captivating book to inspire your own metaphorical statements.”

Click here to read the full list of “Picture Books You Can Use for Writing Prompts”

All the World a Poem brings “both poems and the concept of poetry to a child’s level” says Learning Magazine

Posted on June 24th, 2017 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2“Rhymed or unrhymed, regular or irregular, the verses bring both poems and the concept of poetry to a child’s level.”

Read the full review in the Spring 2017 issue of Learning Magazine

ILA Literacy Daily includes The Wolves Return in their list of “STEM Stories”

Posted on June 23rd, 2017 by pajamapress

thewolvesreturn_website“With an engaging, accessible text and expressive mixed-media illustrations, Godkin tells the environmental success story of the reintroduction of the grey wolf to Yellowstone National Park….An endnote, ‘The Wolf in North America,’ provides history of the wolf and a map of the pre-European and current North American wolf range.”

Click here to read the full list of “STEM Stories” from ILA Literacy Daily

Imagination Soup encourages French Toast as a “book to talk about differences, similarities, and kindness”

Posted on June 23rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“Phoebe’s grandmother, Nan-Ma, helps her talk out why the kids call her ‘French Toast’ then helps Phoebe celebrate her own skin tone as well as the variety of skin tones in her Jamaican, French-Canadian family using with beautiful food metaphors. Use this book to talk about differences, similarities, and kindness.”

Click here to read the full list “New Stories for the Readers on Your Lap”

All the World a Poem is part of ILA Literacy Today‘s list of “Books Too Good to Miss”

Posted on June 23rd, 2017 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2“Some of Gilles Tibo’s poetry is decidedly child friendly…and some is sophisticated….Manon Gauthier’s collage art…will draw the attention of young children to this picture book that invites them to explore the world of poetry through both reading and writing.”
—CA

Click here to read the full review

My Beautiful Birds is part of Booklist‘s 2016 Editors’ Choice issue

Posted on June 21st, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“Using intricate sculpted-clay artwork, Canadian author-illustrator Del Rizzo tells the story of a fictional family’s escape from war-torn Syria. While war isn’t mentioned specifically in the text, readers will get an immediate sense of danger as they observe the family fleeing from a burning city…[T]his story draws attention to an important world issue without subjecting young readers to its harshest realities.”
Julia Smith

Read the full review on page 102 of the January 2017 issue of Booklist

Orange Marmalade calls Adrift at Sea a “stunning book” that “conveys exceptionally well just what refugee children endure”

Posted on June 20th, 2017 by pajamapress

AdriftAtSea_website“This stunning book tells the story of Tuan Ho, who at age 6 was forced to flee Vietnam with his mother and sisters….

His flight would be traumatic: terror, grief, gunfire, strangers, and perilous days adrift at sea. This taut account conveys exceptionally well just what refugee children endure, enlarging our compassion and will to be among those who welcome, comfort, and receive them today.

Deines’ brilliant paintings easily carry the weight of this story and knit our hearts to Tuan’s family. An afterword, accompanied by some personal photographs from Tuan, provides background to the exodus of the ‘boat people’ from Vietnam and tells more about Tuan’s family’s journey.”

Click here to read the full review

My Beautiful Birds “is poignant but not too heavy” says Orange Marmalade

Posted on June 20th, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“Based on the experiences of a young boy in the Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan, this glimpse of the overarching as well as deeply personal, individual losses for refugee children is poignant but not too heavy. Colorful, clay-sculpted illustrations create friendly, engaging visuals as well.”

Click here to read the full review