Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘picture-books’

French Toast received praise from Omnilibros for its “imaginative artwork”

Posted on May 24th, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“Phoebe, who is half Jamaican and half French-Canadian, hates when her classmates call her ‘French Toast.’…The imaginative artwork blends traditional drawing and painting with digital imagery using collage, acrylic, watercolor, and computer manipulation.”

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My Beautiful Birds is “a gentle yet moving story” says 49th Shelf

Posted on May 24th, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“A gentle yet moving story of refugees of the Syrian civil war, My Beautiful Birds illuminates the ongoing crisis as it affects its children. It shows the reality of the refugee camps, where people attempt to pick up their lives and carry on. And it reveals the hope of generations of people as they struggle to redefine home.”

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Under the Umbrella reminds readers “that bright moments can be found on…the gloomiest of days” says 49th Shelf

Posted on May 23rd, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“Catherine Buquet’s touching debut in lyrical rhyme, accompanied by Marion Arbona’s bold and stylish illustrations, celebrates intergenerational friendship and the magic of sharing. It also reminds children and adults alike that bright moments can be found on even the gloomiest of days.”

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Under the Umbrella is a “delightful read-aloud” says Omnilibros

Posted on May 18th, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“Bold, fantastical illustrations that play with perspective, shape, and color accompany the rhyming text which is a delightful read-aloud.”

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Smithsonian Book Dragon says Adrift at Sea is “[f]illed with urgency, fear, and ultimately hope”

Posted on May 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

AdriftAtSea_website“Prodigious Canadian author Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch has built an admirable, award-winning reputation by writing about difficult subjects for younger readers, including the Armenian genocide, world wars, and Canadian internment….

In her latest picture book, Skrypuch presents then-6-year-old Tuan Ho who, with his mother and two older sisters, leave their Ho Chi Minh City home in the darkness of night, and dodge gunshots to board a fishing boat….With a rich palette of deep, vibrant colors, artist Brian Deines adds swirling desperation and swift motion across every detailed spread.

…Filled with urgency, fear, and ultimately hope, Tuan’s real-life odyssey proves to be an illuminating inspiration for all readers.”

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When the Rain Comes “provides a suspenseful slice of South Asian life” says OmniLibros

Posted on May 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

WhenRainComes_website“The free verse text provides a suspenseful slice of South Asian life. Paint and pencil impressionistic illustrations depict the rain’s ferocity. Back matter gives additional information about Sri Lanka, its geography, and the importance of rice to the culture.”

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A “graceful, even uplifting book” says The New York Times of My Beautiful Birds

Posted on May 15th, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“If you’ve been wondering how to present the refugee crisis to children without losing faith in humanity, take a look at this graceful, even uplifting book. Del Rizzo’s stunning dimensional art, made mostly of clay, can’t help feeling playful, and the story brims with hope.”

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How Do You Feel? is “so perfect” for almost 2 year olds says Picture Book Play Date

Posted on May 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

HowDoYouFeel_website“Oh this book is so perfect for Little Miss (closing in on her second birthday in a few months)….The text is also rhyming which is so great for this age. The illustrations are delightfully soft – a perfect compliment to the text.”

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Friends Journal has “no hesitation in recommending [A Year of Borrowed Men] for families, meetings, and schools”

Posted on May 11th, 2017 by pajamapress

AYearOfBorrowedMen_Website“The text is clear and accessible to young readers. The narrative is interesting for reading aloud. The illustrations are beautiful full-page, and sometimes double-page, spreads, all in generous color. For me they combine clarity and immediacy with an evocative quality from the picture books of my own childhood.

I have no hesitation in recommending this book for families, meetings, and schools. The apparent simplicity of style and narrative offers opportunities for exploration of such matters as the definition of ‘enemies,’ how people change and behave under oppression and stress, how friendship can be demonstrated in the little, unassuming acts of everyday life.

Since the 1940s of my childhood, Germans are ‘enemies’ only in novels and films. But there is in the twenty-first century no shortage of so-called ‘enemies.’ The challenge of this book is to ask: How can we escape from the bondage of defining as ‘enemies’ people who don’t conform to our narrow definitions of ‘friends’? How can we welcome, accept, and value people we think of as ‘them’?

My friend’s granddaughter has been looking at books with me. My friend was born a few months before me, and like Gerda, he was born in Germany. He has lived in England for many decades. Although our families were ‘enemies’ when we were born, we have known nothing but friendship with each other. This book reminds me that such friendship is a precious fruit of peace that requires eternal vigilance and attention to the little things.”

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Under the Umbrella is a “rhyming delight” says Picture Book Play Date

Posted on May 11th, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“[Under the Umbrella] was the second book I won from Pajama Press Books and it’s another rhyming delight. If you liked RAIN! by Linda Ashman/Christian Robinson then you should add this one to your reading list….Great read that we will treasure, particularly on rainy days.”

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