Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘picture-books’

Wild One “is sure to entertain tiny tots” says Where Vancouver

Posted on March 7th, 2018 by pajamapress

WildOne_Website“This sweet picture book is sure to entertain tiny tots with its gentle rhyming couplets outlining one little girl’s perfect day at the playground and pool.”
—Sheri Radford

Read the full review on page 26 of the March-April 2018 issue of Where Vancouver

Small Things earns a Booklist Starred Review

Posted on March 1st, 2018 by pajamapress

SmallThings_Website“In this wordless picture book-graphic novel mashup, originally published in Australia, artist Tregonning introduces an unnamed boy grappling with corrosive anxiety….Much like the boy’s ever-transforming anxieties, panels shift from slender, compressed squares to sweeping double-page spreads. The otherworldly glow of the black-and-white palette, too, elegantly underscores the boy’s ongoing battle against darkness. More than a moving portrayal of one boy’s struggle, this is also a magnifying lens through which to identify and discuss mental illness with readers of all ages. Don’t let its title or page count fool you, Small Things’ effects are monumental.”
— Briana Shemroske

Read the full review in the April 2018 issue of Booklist

CM Magazine calls Where's Bunny? “an ideal bedtime book”

Posted on February 27th, 2018 by pajamapress

WheresBunny_Website“Told with sparse language, Where’s Bunny? will appeal to the very young. Its soothing pace makes it an ideal bedtime book. It includes supplementary material – a bedtime checklist and a “clean teeth” checklist….The illustrations are simple, interesting, and cheerful, with an emphasis toward the blue range of the colour spectrum. The children have happy expressions, even during times of potential strife, such as brushing teeth or saying goodnight (as any parent could attest to!). Refreshing, too, is the depiction of children of colour.

Young children are sure to be soothed by the content, pace, and illustration of Where’s Bunny?

Highly Recommended.
—Roxy Garstad is the Collections Librarian at MacEwan University in Edmonton, AB.

Click here to read the full review

School Library Connection calls The Night Lion a “wonderful selection for children suffering from nighttime fears”

Posted on February 24th, 2018 by pajamapress

TheNightLion_Website“In brief, straightforward sentences and soft pastel illustrations, Dufft depicts strategies that young Morgan uses to face his nighttime fears….The soft hazy amber tones of the illustrations perfectly enhance Morgan’s playful antics and night-flight fantasy. Morgan and his storyline are both reminiscent of Sendak’s infamous Max. A wonderful selection for children suffering from nighttime fears. Recommended.
Dr. Christie Kaaland, School Library Instructor, Antioch University Seattle, Seattle, Washington

Read the full review in the May/June 2018 issue of School Library Connection

“Beautiful full-page watercolor illustrations perfectly accompany this tale of a child conquering his/her fears” says Youth Services Book Review of The Night Lion

Posted on February 23rd, 2018 by pajamapress

TheNightLion_WebsiteWhat did you like about the book? Morgan has a tall Robin Hood hat and a wooden sword. He is ‘wild and fierce and frightening.’ But at night Morgan is still afraid of robbers until his Nana brings him a stuffed lion. And, as with Calvin with his Hobbes, Morgan dreams of the adventures he and his lion experience in the woods where he is always brave and fearless. Beautiful full-page watercolor illustrations perfectly accompany this tale of a child conquering his/her fears….

To whom would you recommend this book? This is a good tale for children having problems with bad dreams and might be shared with the classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.”
Katrina Yurenka, Moderator, Youth Services Book Review

Click here to read the full review

Youth Services Book Review calls Baby Cakes “a very endearing story”

Posted on February 22nd, 2018 by pajamapress

BabyCakes_WebsiteRating: 1-5 (5 is an excellent or a Starred review) 4.5

What did you like about the book? It’s time to bake! A little girl is going to show her little brother how. Aprons, big bowl, measuring cups, spoons and ingredients. Very expressive digitally created watercolor illustrations accompanied by very large bold typeface create a very endearing story….

To whom would you recommend this book? It would be really fun if a child were baking with a parent to read it while the cupcakes are baking.”
Katrina Yurenka, Moderator, Youth Services Book Review

Click here to read the full review

Small Things is a book that Marmalade Books “won’t forget”

Posted on February 18th, 2018 by pajamapress

SmallThings_Website“According to parenting and teaching educator Barbara Coloroso, childhood anxiety is an issue facing an alarming number of youth today. The subject is hit head-on in Small Things, an amazing and emotional new wordless graphic picture book for ages 8-12, by Australian artist Mel Tregonning.

I received an advance copy from the Canadian publisher Pajama Press. It immediately reminded me of Shaun Tan’s book The Arrival, published in 2007. I never forgot this migrant story. Also wordless in graphic book style, it was the perfect way for the ‘reader’ to really feel what it would be like to arrive in a foreign country, not able to speak or read the language or understand the culture….

Mel Tregonning was obviously inspired by Shaun Tan’s work and created a similar opportunity for readers to see what it would be like to walk in the shoes of a child suffering from debilitating anxiety….

This is an important book for pre-teens and young teens that deal with or know someone that deals with anxiety. A must for middle grade school libraries and would be an ideal conversation starter for classrooms.

Like The ArrivalSmall Things is also a book this bookseller won’t forget.”

Click here to read the full review

Resource Links calls The Night Lion “dreamlike”, “irresistible”, and “comforting”

Posted on February 16th, 2018 by pajamapress

TheNightLion_Website“Rating: E…The clever illustrations are beautifully rendered in water colour and enhance the dreamlike intrepid tone of the story. The picture of Morgan asleep with the full grown lion is especially irresistible. The comforting story encourages young children suffering from nightmares to conquer their fears. Thematic Links: Nightmares; Dreams; Lions; Self-esteem; Grandmothers”
—Isobel Lang

Read the full review on page 3 of the February 2018 issue of Resource Links Magazine

Resource Links says Woodrow at Sea is “a strong addition to any library”

Posted on February 16th, 2018 by pajamapress

WoodrowAtSea_Website“Rating: G…This wordless book could also be called a beginning graphic novel….

This book represents a positive message of friendship, peace and harmony, which are common themes in Edwards’ work….[A] good exemplar to show children how to create a wordless book (using illustrations to tell a story) as well as a fantastic example of a book that allows for elaboration and multiple interpretations by each reader (as it has no text to direct the full narrative) and each reading and reader will see different nuances and make different connections based on their own imaginations and lived experiences. This book will be a strong addition to any library. Thematic Links: Sea Journeys; Friendship; Wordless Book”
—Erin Hansen

Read the full review on page 3 of the February 2018 issue of Resource Links Magazine

Small Things “is one of the most unique books [Book Time] has read in a while”

Posted on February 16th, 2018 by pajamapress

SmallThings_WebsiteSmall Things by Mel Tregonning ($22.95, Pajama Press) is one of the most unique picture books I have read in a while….

In the afterword by Barbara Coloroso, author of Kids Are Worth It, writes ‘Mel Tregonning speaks volumes about childhood anxiety – an issue facing an alarming number of youth today.’…

Once I read that afterword, my first thought was Wow. What a powerful message with powerful illustrations.

But I wondered if my nine-year-old son would get it. When I ‘read’ it to him, I told him the black creatures were demons and we looked through the story together. I explained to him about anxiety and not letting fear get in your way of doing what you want to do. I plan to keep this book and pull it out once in a while to remind my son of what doubt, fear and negative self-talk can do. Because I think Coloroso is right – this book is a great starting pointing to help identify anxiety and ensure my son never let the demons win.”

Click here to read the full review