Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘kenya’

Community Soup is wonderful for young readers looking to explore their culinary side” says New York Botanical Gardens

Posted on August 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

Community Soup by Alma FullertonCommunity Soup is a short fun tale that welcomes everyone, including goats to join in making the community soup! You too can join in by following the Pumpkin Soup Recipe at the very end of the book. Alma Fullerton uses bright colors and texture in excitingly visual collages throughout the book. Each page comes alive and pops right off the page! Community Soup is wonderful for young readers looking to explore their culinary side with a little help from Kioni and her friends!”

Click here to read the full review

Noodling With Words falls hard for Community Soup

Posted on February 21st, 2014 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_LR“This was another case of love at first sight! And I fell hard…What I like love about this book: The collage illustrations give an amazing three-dimensional sense to the story. I’ve seen other great collage work (Knock, Knock springs to mind), but the cover of this book made me want to kiss the goat! (and yes, I’m a goat-kissing kind of person) Just the right amount of fuzzy texture and playful flint in it’s eye. For me, this is a book where the illustrations grabbed me and wouldn’t let go. Sticks and grass layered with colored sand. Simple items combined into exquisite illustrations. The trees, the children’s faces, everything conveyed a joyous, playful feeling. Don’t get me started on the hoof prints that pepper the text…”

Click here for the full review and suggestions for extra resources and activities.

Community Soup has “the perfect ingredients”—Canadian Children’s Book News

Posted on February 20th, 2014 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_LR“It’s soup day at a Kenyan schoolhouse. While the teachers stir the broth, the children gather vegetables from the community garden. All except for one. Little Kioni is looking for her missing herd of goats, only to discover that they have followed her to school and are now wreaking havoc in the garden.  A frustrated Kioni announces, ‘These pesky goats make me so mad… I’d like to put them in the soup.’ This statement turns out to be a ‘eureka’ moment in that the wayward goats do make a contribution to the soup… with their milk!

Alma Fullerton has incorporated the perfect ingredients to create an engaging and charming picture book. With its conversational tone, including a dash of questions and exclamations, Community Soup makes for an excellent read-aloud. One section is similar to ‘Mary Had a Little Lamb,’ which adds to the fun: ‘Kioni has a herd of goats/with hair of calico./And everywhere Kioni goes,/those goats are sure to —/ GO!’

Fullerton’s colourful three-dimensional art, which integrates paper sculpture and mixed media collage, draws readers into that lovely far-away community garden where cooperation, sharing, and commitment are so very important. One can almost feel the textures emanate off the pages. And, as a bonus, a recipe for pumpkin vegetable soup is included…”
—Senta Ross

Picture Book Palooza reviews Community Soup for Storytime

Posted on January 3rd, 2014 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_Med“The story is fun and lively, but the art draws you in to look closer and see what may be – that lea[f], hmm, it looks like a silk leaf.  The ground and dirt look like real ground or dirt, the trees look like they have been scratched in to plaster.  The painted faces of children are precious.  I’ll use this with Storytime preschoolers up to second or third grade.”

Click Here to read the full post.

Sal’s Fiction Addiction enjoys Community Soup

Posted on November 14th, 2013 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_Med“It’s lovely for young readers to catch a glimpse of village life in Kenya. The sentences are short and tell their story with a lively pace. The textural cut paper and collage illustrations add a lovely touch, and will invite close attention to the happenings in the village as the communal soup is prepared. Bright backgrounds match the brilliance of the children’s attire and the soup recipe shared at the back had my mouth watering…it is that time of year for the comfort it brings…”

Click here to read the full review.

Resource Links reviews Community Soup

Posted on November 5th, 2013 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_Med“This is a book about school age children in Kenya who have a garden outside their school and work together to harvest the vegetables to make a communal soup for all to share. Unfortunately one child, unable to tie up her goats brings them to school where the children have a lot of laughs trying to stop them from eating their vegetables. At one point someone has the idea to milk the goats and add the milk to the communal soup which makes it more delicious.

This is a fun read that helps children understand the way of life of Kenyan school children and how different their life is from our own. It also describes the various vegetables and what goes into making soup and in the end even gives a recipe for making a pumpkin vegetable soup to make at home with an adult.

Curricular applications include learning about Kenya: discovering a world outside their own, how children work alongside parents and teachers and that children have chores to do before attending school, how community gardens work and how everyone gets to share in the work and in the cultivation, and how to make a communal soup and what goes in.

Thematic links: Children Working Together; Community Gardening and Cooking; Goats.”

Carmen Poulin

Learn more about Resource Links.

Savoring the Bounty of Gardens and Food—Reading Today Online reviews Community Soup

Posted on July 30th, 2013 by pajamapress

“Book Reviews: Savoring the Bounty of Gardens and Good Food”

—The International Reading Association reviews books about gardening and food, including Community Soup by Alma Fullerton

“’It’s soup day!’ The first line of this story draws readers into a day-in-the-life of Kenyan school community, which Fullerton depicts with mixed-media collage and paper-sculptures that lend a diorama-like depth to each scene….A satisfying and worthy purchase…”

Click here to read the full review.

Agy Wilson reviews Community Soup

Posted on July 22nd, 2013 by pajamapress

“Fullerton masterfully runs through the paces and emotions of tracking down the pesky, calico haired goats, her illustrations colorful and very tactile. Very different and visually appealing with her mixture of painted and reference materials, cloth and cut outs[.] I really liked the feel of the illustrations.”

—Agy Wilson, author/illustrator

Click here to read the full review.

Alma Fullerton on Open Book Ontario

Posted on June 26th, 2013 by pajamapress

Alma Fullerton is an award-winning children’s author living in Midland, Ontario. Although she’s an accomplished visual artist, her newest book, Community Soup (Pajama Press), is the first book she’s illustrated herself. Directed towards children ages four to seven, Community Soup gives young Canadians a fun look at everyday life in a Kenyan village, including a mischievous herd of goats.

Today, Alma tells Open Book about why she writes for children and how she gets it all done.”

Click here to read the interview.

Community Soup is “a nourishing choice”—Kirkus Reviews

Posted on June 8th, 2013 by pajamapress

Mary’s little lamb becomes a village child’s goats in this quirky, Kenya-set tale of making pumpkin vegetable soup.

The story opens with children picking vegetables from a community garden. “But where is Kioni?” Kioni is looking for her goats. Suddenly, the text turns into a familiar rhyme, adapted to reflect its setting in an unnamed Kenyan village. Kioni’s goats “with hair of calico” almost eat the vegetables, but they make a better contribution to the soup instead (never fear: It’s just their milk). Textured collage illustrations combining natural materials and painted images show the busy children, the corn, pumpkin, sweet potato and other vegetables that make up the soup, and Kioni’s calico-haired goats. The simple text is set on harvest-toned pages opposite full-bleed pictures. At one point, two consecutive images carry the action. Two double-page spreads emphasize highlights: goats in the garden (“GO!”) and, at the end, goats and children each eating their appropriate foods. The story concludes with a recipe. Fullerton, who introduced young readers to rural Uganda in A Good Trade (illustrated by Karen Patkau; 2013), provides a positive picture of community cooperation in another rural setting, identified as Kenya in the publisher’s cataloging.

For reading aloud or alone, a nourishing choice. (Picture book. 4-7)
—Kirkus Reviews