Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘kari-lynn-winters’

Three Pajama Press titles are finalists for the 2017 Willow Awards

Posted on April 5th, 2017 by pajamapress

Pajama Press is thrilled to announce that three of our titles have been nominated for the 2017 Willow Awards.

French Toastwritten by Kari-Lynn Winters and illustrated by François Thisdale, is a finalist for the Shining Willow Award.

FrenchToast_WebsiteIn this picture book, Phoebe, the daughter of a white French-Canadian mother and a Jamaican English-speaking father, dislikes her school nickname of “French Toast.” Gently prompted by her blind grandmother, she uses descriptions of familiar foods from both cultures to explain the family’s varied skin colors—and realizes she can take ownership of the nickname proudly. Quill & Quire says it is “simply told and cleverly imagined” in their starred review.

 

Sky Pig, written by Jan L. Coates and illustrated by Suzanne Del Rizzo, is also a finalist for the Shining Willow Award.

SkyPig_WebsiteIn Sky Pig, Jan L. Coates weaves a story of sweetness and whimsy, ingenuity and empathy. Plasticine artist Suzanne Del Rizzo brings dimension and energy to the tale of a pig who wants—against all popular truisms—to fly. He may never reach the sky on homemade clockwork wings, but Ollie still dreams as hard as ever a pig can dream. And Jack, a true friend, realizes that just because a pig can’t fly in the ways they have tried doesn’t mean he can never soar. An uplifting picture book for anyone who has tried and tried again. Sky Pig is also a 2016 Best Books for Kids and Teens selection. 

 

The Hill by Karen Bass is a finalist for the Snow Willow Award.

TheHill_Website

Jared’s plane has crashed in the Alberta wilderness, and Kyle is first on the scene. After a night spent on the hilltop the teens discover something odd: the plane has disappeared. And worst of all, something is hunting them. Karen Bass, the multi-award-winning author of Graffiti Knight and Uncertain Soldier, brings her signature action packed style to a chilling new subject: the Cree Wîhtiko legend. Inspired by the real story of a remote plane crash and by the legends of her Cree friends and neighbours, Karen brings eerie life—or perhaps something other than life—to the northern Alberta landscape. The Hill was also a White Ravens 2016 selection, and a 2016 Best Books for Kids and Teens selection.

From the Willow Awards website:

“The mission of The Willow Awards is to promote reading by granting a “Willow Award” to the Canadian and/or Saskatchewan book(s) voted by Saskatchewan students to be the best of those nominated in designated categories for a specific year.”

For more information about these awards, please visit the Willow Awards website.

See the full list of 2017 Willow Awards finalists here.

The Vermont Country Sampler recommends both Good Pirate and Bad Pirate

Posted on March 29th, 2017 by pajamapress

BadPirate_Internet“At some stage in their lives daughters can become in­dependent, uppity and seemingly too savvy for their own good. But if this willful daughter is an appealing Springer Spaniel named Augusta aboard a pirate ship full of other dogs with her father as captain, things will happen that will ‘shiver your timbers.’…

Meet the foul-mouthed Captain Barnacle Garrick, his irresistible daughter, and a motley crew of sea dogs as they capture loot or survive a storm at sea. Depending on the circumstances Capt. Barnacle demands that the crew, includ­ing his daughter, be Rotten, Sneaky and Brainy in the Good Pirate book and Saucy, Bold and Selfish in The Bad Pirate book. How these commands are obeyed is illustrated in some of the most captivating seafaring dog drawings and captain-fearing adventures. You will be intrigued by the bombastic captain with his menacing hook, his free-spirited daughter who loves vanilla as a perfume, and the life of the pirate dogs….”GoodPirate_Website

Read the full review on page 28 of the March 2017 issue of the Vermont Country Sampler

Bad Pirate “is a great read aloud book that will keep young children entertained” says Youth Services Book Review

Posted on March 6th, 2017 by pajamapress

Bad Pirate by Kari-Lynn Winters and Dean GriffithsWhat did you like about the book? Written in the jargon and accent of a true pirate, this book is a great read aloud book that will keep young children entertained. The illustrations are large and colorful so children hearing this book at a story hour in a library will be able to see the pictures with no problem.…

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This is recommended for ages 5-8. Children who love pirates and have read the “Good Pirate” book will love this book.

Who should buy this book? This would be good for elementary school libraries and public libraries that have a children’s section….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?  Yes”
Sandra Pacheco, ESL teacher, Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full review

Youth Services Book Review says French Toast “would be a good addition to a multi-cultural library”

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_WebsiteRating: (1-5, 5 is an excellent or starred review) 4

What did you like about the book? This is a beautiful book about a little girl who is half Jamaican and half French Canadian….The illustrations are wonderful and the descriptions of the food are perfect.

Anything you didn’t like about it? I liked everything about this book.

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This is recommended for children ages 4-7. It would be a good addition to a multi-cultural library. Kindergarten children will also enjoy the story read aloud to them. It will stimulate discussion on race.

Who should buy this book? This would be good for elementary school libraries and public libraries that have a children’s section….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?  Yes”
Sandra Pacheco ESL teacher, Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full review

“The author [of French Toast] explains the concept of diversity in a positive life affirming way” says Resource Links

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“…A gentle loving explanation of how everyone has different skin tones expressed in warm delicious ways. Bullying is part of the story but Phoebe’s approach of not letting her bullies know that their nickname bothers her helps to defuse any power they have over her.

The illustrations are beautiful and the illustrator does beautiful portraits of his characters using digital media and acrylic….The author explains the concept of diversity in a positive life affirming way that children and adults will appreciate.”

Thematic Links: Grandmothers; Self-esteem; Bullying; Racially Mixed People; Identity; Diversity; Immigration; Blindness
—Isobel Lang

Read the full review on page 12 of the February 2017 issue of Resource Links

Good Pirate “is a fun pick” says Midwest Book Review

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by pajamapress

GoodPirate_WebsiteGood Pirate receives fun drawings by Dean Griffiths, who brings to life the story of a dog pirate who just is too good to be inconsiderate….A fun survey, this doggy pirate show is a fun pick with its oversized, colorful drawings and cartoon-like ‘balloon’ conversations between very different pirates.”

Click here to read the full review

French Toast gets a positive review from The International Educator

Posted on February 21st, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light. …Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

Good Pirate “is a great read aloud book” says Youth Services Book Review

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

GoodPirate_WebsiteWhat did you like about the book? Written in the jargon and accent of a true pirate, this book is a great read aloud book that will keep young children entertained. The illustrations are large and colorful so children hearing this book at a story hour in a library will be able to see the pictures with no problem. This is a story of a pack of dog pirates who are off to plunder and pillage. One of the crew, the captain’s daughter is an unlikely pillager as she is more concerned with more frilly things. When she saves the day by rescuing the rest of the dogs from the mangy pirate cats, she shows how clever a frilly pirate can be….

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This is recommended for ages 5-8. Children who love pirates and have read the “Bad Pirate” book will love this book.

Who should buy this book? This would be good for elementary school libraries and public libraries that have a children’s section….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?  yes”
Sandra Pacheco, ESL teacher, Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full review

The International Educator gives French Toast a positive review

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light.…Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

Read the full review on page 40 of the February 2017 issue of The International Educator

Winnipeg Free Press recommends French Toast as a gift for young readers this holiday season

Posted on December 16th, 2016 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“This is a delightful picture book from an Ontario writer that celebrates the joys of diversity….Montreal artist François Tisdale’s illustrations, in warm brown colours of honey and maple syrup, help make this little book delicious.”

Click here to read the full article