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Posts Tagged ‘ho-chi-minh-city’

Last Airlift “highly recommended” by Ten Stories Up

Posted on May 18th, 2012 by pajamapress

[Last Airlift] would make a wonderful story, even if it were completely made up.  But it’s not.  Last Airlift is 100% nonfiction…At the same time, it reads like a novel, with characters and dialogue, bringing the experience of a young refugee vividly to life…Highly recommended to history fans, native North Americans interested in other cultures, and kids who love survival stories. –Lindsay Carmichael

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CanLit for LittleCanadians reviews Last Airlift

Posted on April 10th, 2012 by pajamapress

…Tuyet becomes a heroine of her own story, using her fortitude, observations, and humanity to navigate the new territories outside of the orphanage and to make herself fit in.

Read the Full Review Here

The Westfield Booktalker calls Last Airlift “fascinating and poignant…”

Posted on March 22nd, 2012 by pajamapress

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School Library Journal Review of Last Airlift

Posted on March 16th, 2012 by pajamapress

“The author tells Tuyet’s story with respect and dignity, introducing readers to a brave girl caught up in the turbulent times of her country, her fears of leaving what she knew, and the joy of finding a new life. Her story will appeal to a broad range of readers”

- School Library Journal

Resource Links Review of Last Airlift

Posted on February 23rd, 2012 by pajamapress

“Marsha Skrypuch’s gift is her ability to tell stories of under-privileged children in faraway lands. Tuyet’s biography demonstrates her talent…Tuyet’s story is an excellent example of the biography genre for younger students ; a multi-cultural perspective on being an immigrant child in Canada, and also a snapshot of a child’s life during war…Highly recommended.”

Book Dragon calls Last Airlift a “touching, multi-layered experience”

Posted on February 21st, 2012 by pajamapress

Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch is one of those mega-award winning Canadian authors (with more than a dozen titles) who hasn’t crossed over our shared border (just yet!) with the same success. She’s best known for her historical novels for younger readers about what must be one of the most difficult subjects ever – children and war…Enhanced with documents and a surprising number of photographs, Airlift is a touching, multi-layered experience. The strength of Skrypuch’s storytelling shows strongest in the smallest details…”

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Last Airlift excerpt and ad in The Winnipeg Review

Posted on February 4th, 2012 by pajamapress

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Last Airlift noted on WPL New Children’s Books – Sizzling Staff Selections

Posted on February 2nd, 2012 by pajamapress

“Based on personal interviews and enhanced with archive photos, Tuyet’s story of the Saigon orphanage and her flight to Canada is an emotional and suspenseful journey….”

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Kirkus Review of Last Airlift

Posted on February 2nd, 2012 by pajamapress

“Skrypuch (Daughter of War, 2008) tells the story of the last Canadian airlift through the memories of one child, Son Thi Anh Tuyet. Nearly 8 years old, the sad-eyed girl on the cover had lived nearly all her life in a Catholic orphanage. With no warning, she and a number of the institution babies were taken away, placed on an airplane and flown to a new world. Tuyet’s memories provide poignant, specific details….In an afterword, the author describes her research, including personal interviews and newspaper accounts from the time. But Tuyet’s experience is her focus. It personalizes the babylift without sensationalizing it….Immediate and compelling, this moving refugee story deserves a wide audience.”

View the Review Here

Great review in the Winnipeg Free Press, “Put a few quiet moments under the tree”

Posted on December 12th, 2011 by pajamapress

 

Last Airlift: A Vietnamese Orphan’s Rescue from War

By Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

WHEN the Americans pull out of Saigon in April 1975, many babies are rescued from the orphanage where eight-year-old Tuyet has lived for years. The orphanage is to be abandoned and the children left alone.

But Tuyet had polio and walks with a limp; she doesn’t expect to be chosen to go to a foreign country.

Ontario-based Skrypuch, who has written a number of award-winning books for young people, tells the true story of how this little girl is transported to Toronto and finds a loving home with a Canadian family. She makes us feel Tuyet’s fears, confusion and loneliness as she adjusts to her new home. Her book uses actual photographs of Tuyet and her family.

View the Review Here