Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘early-readers’

Publishers Weekly says Waiting for Sophie is a “sweet and relatable story”

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“The arrival of a new baby sibling conjures mixed emotions for a boy named Liam in this sweet and relatable story from [Sarah] Ellis…[Carmen] Mok’s warm digital illustrations tenderly depict Liam’s moments of adjustment…”

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Waiting for Sophie “is a gentle story which will definitely appeal to young readers with siblings” says Resource Links

Posted on April 20th, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“…Liam loves to play with little Sophie, and everyone says that he is her favourite person. However, even after three weeks, Sophie is still just lying in her crib. It is taking much too long for little Sophie to grow up and to be able to play with him….How will Liam learn to cope?

This is a beautifully written chapter book about the relationship between Liam and his new baby sister Sophie….Young Liam is an appealing character who loves his little sister, but definitely wants her to grow up quickly so that she will not break his toys, and will be able to play with him. Throughout the story, Liam learns how to love his sister, but more importantly, learns how to be more patient with her. The illustrations are colourful and filled with lots of detail which adds to the narrative….This is a gentle story which will definitely appeal to young readers with siblings, as well as the adults who care for them!

Thematic Links: Sibling Relationships; Babies; Family Relationships; Grandparents; Building; Playing With Young Children; Patience”
—Myra Junyk

Read the full review on page 9-10 of the April 2017 issue of Resource Links

CanLit for LittleCanadians says “Young children being challenged to read their first chapter books will appreciate [Waiting for Sophie]”

Posted on March 29th, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“Waiting can be so hard for little ones, especially when it’s for a baby sister who is taking her time being born and growing up so you can play with her. And this waiting is just about killing little Liam….

Sarah Ellis gives Liam a voice that is so filled with hope about his new sister and the promise of having a familial playmate that even his frustrations are natural and unfeigned. He speaks with his heart, never with meanness or anger, though he acknowledges the annoyance of biding his time. Sophie has a great big brother. And, although Waiting for Sophie is an early reader, rather than a picture book, the illustrations by Carmen Mok augment Sarah Ellis’ story with the innocence and family that the author’s words already convey.

Young children being challenged to read their first chapter books will appreciate this early reader as it will undoubtedly speak to them. So many know the anguish of waiting, whether for a new sibling to be born or some other significant life event, and will easily put themselves in Liam’s shoes. Maybe they’ll undertake their own DIY project, with a little help from an adult, or maybe they’ll find their own coping strategies but you can be sure that they’ll appreciate Liam’s story of Waiting for Sophie and the fun that can be had with it.”

Click here to read the full review

Waiting for Sophie is “Highly Recommended” by CM Magazine

Posted on March 22nd, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“Sarah Ellis is one of Canada’s most successful writer of children’s books (Back of BeyondBen Overnight, and several volumes in the “I, Canada” series). She is also a critic, a teacher and a librarian.

Utilizing the trope of “new baby – concerned older brother – problem with new baby – happy ending”, Ellis begins her story with Liam, who looks about six, being woken up by Nana-Downstairs, a hip lady in pants and designer specs. Mom and Dad have gone to the hospital because new sister Sophie is on the way.

Ellis’ trademark wry humour comes into play almost immediately…

Carmen Mok, who has many picturebook and magazine credits to her name, has graced the pages with some charming digitally-created art with the look of watercolours, mostly images of the characters in the story. The font chosen is a large, clear one, and the layout beckons new readers of ‘chapter books’ to give it a try. The book would also be appropriate for a slighter younger audience for reading aloud.

Waiting for Sophie is a fine addition to library collections, especially those requiring more easy novels with contemporary themes.

Highly Recommended.
Ellen Heaney

Click here to read the full review

A good review for Good Morning, Grumple from Publishers Weekly

Posted on January 30th, 2017 by pajamapress

goodmorninggrumple_website“This padded storybook with sturdy cardstock pages follows a mother’s persistent efforts to get her sleepy ‘grumple’ out of bed in the morning. Allenby’s intermittently rhyming text traces the mother’s escalating actions, which involve singing ever-louder…Gauthier’s naif collages sweetly emphasize the warmth between parent and child (they resemble a cross between a panda and a squirrel), even when the little one’s eyes are squeezed tight in a desperate attempt to hang onto sleep a little longer.”

Read the full review in the January 30 issue of Publishers Weekly

How Do You Feel? is “perfect for little ones” Midwest Book Review

Posted on December 12th, 2016 by pajamapress

HowDoYouFeel_website“The toad feels bumpy, like a gnarly tree. The snake feels smooth, like a stone polished by the sea. One by one the hedgehog discovers the textures of his animal friends. But how does the hedgehog feel himself? Award-winning author/illustrator Rebecca Bender’s How Do You Feel? will utterly charm children ages 2 to 5 with its lyrical text, endearing animals, and surprise ending. The small trim size and padded hardcover format make it perfect for little ones, who may even be inspired to find new ways of expressing how they feel in every sense of the phrase. Thoroughly ‘kid friendly’ in presentation, How Do You Feel? is very highly recommended for family, preschool, elementary school, and community library collections.”

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