Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘diverse-books’

Children’s Books Heal calls The Theory of Hummingbirds “a powerful and captivating story”

Posted on February 20th, 2018 by pajamapress

TheTheoryOfHummingbirds_Website“Why I like this book: Michelle Kadarusman has crafted a richly textured story about [Alba], who has a leg that is directionally challenged. It is a powerful and captivating story about differences and abilities and ‘learning to love who you are and what you can do.’ It is emotionally honest and filled with heart.

It is important for readers to see themselves in realistic characters like [Alba]….

The author’s use of hummingbirds as a poignant metaphor to help Alba embrace her life in a meaningful way and pursue her big dream. ‘Hummingbirds don’t sit around moaning about their tiny feet and that they can’t walk,’ she says. Like [Alba], the author was born with talipes equinovarus (CTEV), more commonly called club foot.

The plot is paced well with the perfect amount of tension to keep readers intrigued, engaged and guessing.  This is an excellent book for any school library.”

Click here to read the full review

ILA Literacy Daily selects When the Rain Comes among other books that represent “Cultural Diversity in Children’s and Young Adult Literature”

Posted on February 12th, 2018 by pajamapress

WhenRainComes_website“Rendered in pencil and watercolor, the illustrations depict the drama and danger of the wind, driving rain, and Malini’s effort to protect the rice seedlings and soothe the ox.”

Click here to read the full review

Hit or Miss Books compliments the “absolutely gorgeous and, surprisingly, lyrical [illustrations]” in When the Rain Comes

Posted on February 10th, 2018 by pajamapress

WhenRainComes_website“The moods of Sri Lanka’s rainy season come alive as Kim La Fave, illustrator of the award-winning Shin Chi’s Canoe, uses a fresh style that is both contemporary and impressionistic to depict the courage of one little girl facing the power of a flash flood….

The illustrations are absolutely gorgeous and, surprisingly, lyrical. The writing is, too, but even without words, this book would still be fairly easy to understand as well as moving.”

Click here to read the full review

Midwest Book Review says Baby Cakes “is especially recommended for children ages 1 to 3″

Posted on February 7th, 2018 by pajamapress

BabyCakes_Website“Told in simple text by Theo Heras, charmingly illustrated on every page by Renne Benoit, and delivered in a sturdy, padded cover with stronger pages that are perfect for little hands, Baby Cakes…is especially recommended for children ages 1 to 3, making it appropriate for family, daycare center, preschool, and community library collections.”

Click here to read the full review

In a Cloud of Dust is one of Matthew Winner’s top ten picks for books for Universal Human Rights month

Posted on February 7th, 2018 by pajamapress

homecover-in-a-cloud“This look at an experience foreign to most readers in the United States hits on some easy-to-spot universals of children around the world, including the experience of learning, of disappointment, and of playing with friends.”

Click here to read the full review

Slug Days “should help young readers understand [someone with Autism Spectrum Disorder's] emotions” says The Horn Book Magazine

Posted on February 5th, 2018 by pajamapress

SlugDays_Website“The first-person narration makes Lauren’s logic clear…Frequent clear pencil and digital illustrations break up the sometimes-long paragraphs and should help young readers understand Lauren’s emotions and others’ reactions.”
—Shoshana Flax

Read the full review in the March/April 2018 issue of The Horn Book Magazine

Kate Olson calls Wild One “a sweet, sweet story”

Posted on February 1st, 2018 by pajamapress

WildOne_Website“What a sweet, sweet story!…Highly recommended for public and school libraries, as well as a gift for the younger children in your life. I will be using for a read aloud in my 4-year-old kindergarten classes once I can get a copy for my library and will be buying as a gift for many little girls in the future.”

Click here to read the full review

School Library Journal says Wild One “fosters inference and opportunity for shared reading”

Posted on January 30th, 2018 by pajamapress

WildOne_Website“The turn of a page allows readers to predict the next animal comparison, and ink-and-watercolor illustrations record her play with busy movement….VERDICT A recommended general purchase, this read-aloud choice fosters inference and opportunity for shared reading in home or preschool.”
—Mary Elam, Learning Media Services, Plano ISD, TX

Read the full review in the February 2018 issue of School Library Journal

The Crimson Review of Children’s and YA Literature calls Adrift at Sea a “fascinating read”

Posted on January 26th, 2018 by pajamapress

AdriftAtSea_website“This fascinating read gives a glimpse of the struggle and bravery of a refugee….The vibrant illustrations help readers visualize what it might have been like to be on the boat….This is a powerful tale that enables children to learn about a time in history that they may not know about. It also underscores being grateful for what you have, and empowers readers to fight for what they believe in.”
—Rachel Bloomingburg

Click here to read the full review

Macy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess gets 5 stars from Puss Reboots

Posted on January 21st, 2018 by pajamapress

MacyMacMillan_WebsiteMacy McMillan and the Rainbow Goddess by Shari Green is a novel in freeform poetry about a girl trying to come to terms with the big changes in her life. Big changes coming: a new school at the end of sixth grade, a new house, a step dad, and step-siblings (twins)….

The poetry and type face help to express both Macy’s emotional state and the rhythm of sign. ASL has its own grammar — something that is lost when writing out dialog into standard prose. By keeping the lines short and focused on the core actions, items, emotions — there’s more of a sense of how Macy is actually thinking and expressing herself….

Though Macy’s town is never given a name, there are enough clues to suppose it’s somewhere on the north eastern edge of Vancouver Island. The author is from there and it shows in how she lays out the geography of Macy’s world.

Five stars.”

Click here to read the full review