Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘children’s-books’

Under the Umbrella is a “delightful read-aloud” says Omnilibros

Posted on May 18th, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“Bold, fantastical illustrations that play with perspective, shape, and color accompany the rhyming text which is a delightful read-aloud.”

Click here to read the full review

Smithsonian Book Dragon says Adrift at Sea is “[f]illed with urgency, fear, and ultimately hope”

Posted on May 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

AdriftAtSea_website“Prodigious Canadian author Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch has built an admirable, award-winning reputation by writing about difficult subjects for younger readers, including the Armenian genocide, world wars, and Canadian internment….

In her latest picture book, Skrypuch presents then-6-year-old Tuan Ho who, with his mother and two older sisters, leave their Ho Chi Minh City home in the darkness of night, and dodge gunshots to board a fishing boat….With a rich palette of deep, vibrant colors, artist Brian Deines adds swirling desperation and swift motion across every detailed spread.

…Filled with urgency, fear, and ultimately hope, Tuan’s real-life odyssey proves to be an illuminating inspiration for all readers.”

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A “graceful, even uplifting book” says The New York Times of My Beautiful Birds

Posted on May 15th, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“If you’ve been wondering how to present the refugee crisis to children without losing faith in humanity, take a look at this graceful, even uplifting book. Del Rizzo’s stunning dimensional art, made mostly of clay, can’t help feeling playful, and the story brims with hope.”

Click here to read the full review

Water’s Children “will rouse thoughtful discussions of unfamiliar depictions of water” says CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on April 28th, 2017 by pajamapress

waterschildren_website“…Quebec author, visual artist and publisher Angèle Delaunois takes the reader across the world to witness the importance of water to the children of different countries….Canada is represented by two spreads, one from Quebec and one from Nunavut, both which speak in terms of what is most familiar to young Canadian readers….

While other texts and illustrations will be familiar or at least obvious such as the Russian child of a fishing village and the rain experienced by an urban child in Germany, many spreads will rouse thoughtful discussions of unfamiliar depictions of water….

The artwork of Montreal animator, graphic artist and illustrator Gérard Frischeteau rings with authenticity, depicting each global child in both personal and expansive landscapes, often providing details about daily life and family….

In fact, ‘Water is Life’ is a special touch in Water’s Children. On watermarks adorning each spread, the term ‘water is life’ is translated into a corresponding language, including French, Inuktitut, Catalan, German, Portuguese, Tamil, Arabic and Wolof with a final listing of all regions and languages represented in the book.

I know I’ve listed the reading audience as 4 to 8 years of age but don’t follow that. Water’s Children’s audience should read “All ages” or “Everyone” because it is an extraordinarily inspirational examination of the importance of water throughout the world. You can save it for World Water Day (March 22) but I recommend it for this weekend’s Earth Day (April 22) and anytime meaningful attention be paid to a global resource i.e., always.”

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Hat On, Hat Off “humourously captures the complexities of getting a toddler dressed” says the National Reading Campaign

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

HatOnHatOff_1000px“In Hat On, Hat Off, Toronto author and librarian Theo Heras humourously captures the complexities of getting a toddler dressed and ready to go outside….Renné Benoit’s softly hued, realistic watercolour illustrations extend Theo Heras’s simple, conversational text. Subtle swatches of knitting patterns appear in background details. The little boy’s stuffed pal Bunny also wears a hat, brightly decorated with a carrot novelty print. The book’s design is very appealing to little hands, with a soft padded cover, and rounded corners. Infinitely relatable, Hat On, Hat Off is a warm, slice-of-life adventure that is perfect for sharing.”
—Linda Ludke

Click here to read the full review

“What a hopeful, gladsome journey!” Orange Marmalade Books declares of The Wolves Return

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

thewolvesreturn_website“[T]he complex, interactive webs which rely on biodiversity are critical to a healthy planet and to our health as humans….

By hunting [grey] wolves to the point of near-extinction settlers unwittingly disturbed the timeworn balance that had allowed all sorts of plants, animals and waterways to flourish. This lovely book shows how each piece began to be renewed as wolves were re-introduced to Yellowstone beginning in 1995.

Each turn of the page shows another glory of nature able to perform again its vivid song, as the positive, un-domino effect takes place. What a hopeful, gladsome journey! Share this with children ages 4 and up.”

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Village Living Magazine recommends introducing little ones to poetry with All the World a Poem

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2“[T]ry introducing little ones to [poetry] with this picture book…The unique illustrations in All the World a Poem are paper collage art, which adds to the overall artistic aesthetic.”
—Joanne Sallay

Read the full review in the April 2017 issue of Village Living Magazine

Good Morning, Grumple is “a charming tale” says Quill & Quire

Posted on April 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

goodmorninggrumple_website“…Good Morning, Grumple is a sweet story about a sleepy fox-like creature ­­- who does not want to get up in the morning – and the patient mother who knows exactly what to do.

Author Victoria Allenby – whose debut picture books, Nat the Cat Can Sleep Like That, won the 2014 Preschool Reads Award – succeeds once again in crafting a charming tale befitting the kindie set. Just as the mother in Good Morning, Grumple tries different tactics to awaken her sleepy-headed child, Allenby incorporates different narrative styles, moving deftly from rhyming couplets to sing-song lyrics to abrupt variances in rhythm that allow for recalibration and reflection….

The mixed media and paper-collage illustrations by four-time Governor General’s Literary Award nominee Manon Gauthier are rustic in appearance, but convey great depths of emotion….The child-like quality of Gauthier’s work matches the story’s sweet and tender tone, while the gradual increase in text size as the book progresses is a great representation of the experience of waking up and embracing the morning….”
—Sarah Sorensen

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When the Rain Comes “offers a powerful portrait of a child’s bravery and perseverance” says The Hornbook

Posted on April 25th, 2017 by pajamapress

WhenRainComes_website“A perilous flash flood threatens a young Sri Lankan girl’s life and her village’s livelihood in this compelling picture book. Fullerton’s spare and lyrical text opens with Malini waking up, excited to learn how to plant rice seedlings and contribute to her community’s well-being….Endnotes explain the realities of child labor, poverty, and a dependence on rice as a staple crop in Sri Lanka, and the book as a whole offers a powerful portrait of a child’s bravery and perseverance.”
—Megan Dowd Lambert

Read the full review in the May 2017 issue of The Hornbook

When the Rain Comes is featured in School Library Journal‘s collection “Reading Around The World | Picture Books”

Posted on April 25th, 2017 by pajamapress

WhenRainComes_website“…Filled with ear-pleasing rhythms and onomatopoeia, Alma Fullerton’s vivacious free verse paints Malini’s character with deft strokes, and stirringly describes the action. Kim La Fave’s color-splashed illustrations set the scene and create a strong sense of motion, as the ox looms large above the girl, the monsoon unleashes, or Maili returns to the arms of her worried family. When the Rain Comes provides a vivid glimpse at life on an island country in Asia, as well as a satisfying look at a child who discovers the inner fortitude needed to overcome difficult circumstances.”

Click here to read the full review and the rest of the article