Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘chapter-book’

Moon at Nine is rated as “excellent” by Youth Services Book Review

Posted on March 6th, 2017 by pajamapress

Moon At Nine by Deborah Ellis - the true story of two girls who fell in love in post-revolution Iran Rating: 1-5 (5 is an excellent or a Starred review) 5

What did you like about the book? Farrin goes to a school for gifted girls, and when Sadira begins attending her school, the two fall in love. Amid all of the political upheaval in her country, Farrin is caught kissing Sadira and the two are punished. Farrin thinks she can’t survive without seeing Sadira, but can she survive if they stay together? Heart-stirring, believable, and ultimately heartbreaking, this is a must-read.

Anything you didn’t like about it? No

To whom would you recommend this book?  Middle and high school teens…

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? Yes”
—Kasia Piasecka, Falmouth Public Library

Click here to read the full review

Waiting for Sophie “is a good book for any expectant sibling” says Mom Read It

Posted on February 28th, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“…Waiting for Sophie is a great older sibling book for younger school-age kids. Sarah Ellis not only captures the excitement of waiting for a new baby brother or sister, but also gives voice to the little frustrations kids can experience when dealing with a new baby in the house, and the desire to have a playmate their age. Sarah Ellis shows readers the fun side of being an older brother, like being the one to make the baby giggle. The gently colored illustrations make this a cozy reading choice for parents and kids, or educators discussing caregiving, to gather together and enjoy. This is a good book for any expectant sibling…”

Click here to read the full review

Another EXCELLENT review for Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles from Resource Links

Posted on October 20th, 2016 by pajamapress

RootBeerCandyAndOtherMiracles_WebsiteRoot Beer Candy and Other Miracles tackles some serious problems common among kids today. Its resolution is gentle and hopeful, but also realistic….Not everything can be fixed, but sharing a problem with someone who loves us makes it easier to bear. This is a message middle-graders cannot hear too often.

I really enjoyed this book. ‘It’s an excellent choice for thoughtful middle-grade readers and would make a valuable addition to a school or classroom library. It’s also a fine complement to the verse novels of K.A. Holt, and a stepping stone to the work of authors like Sonya Sones, Virginia Euwer Wolff, and Martine Leavitt.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is also a physically beautiful book, generously designed and appealing in the hand. Watch for this one!
—Leslie Vermeer

Read the full review in Resource Links October 2016 issue, page 15

Evie Brooks in Central Park Showdown “will appeal to young female readers who love animals” says Resource Links

Posted on October 20th, 2016 by pajamapress

centralparkshowdown_websiteThis novel will definitely appeal to young female readers who love animals. They will be able to relate to Evie’s everyday issues at school and at the veterinary clinic, as well as her complicated relationships….Agnew’s novel also deals with different kinds of families. Evie lives with her uncle Scott, but her biological father is suing to get custody. Greg and Finn go back and forth between their divorced parents. Lorcan has two dads….Readers will definitely look forward to the next edition of Edie’s adventures in New York!

Read the full review in Resource Links October 2016 issue, page 13

Booklist enjoys Princess Pistachio and the Pest

Posted on August 11th, 2015 by pajamapress

Princess Pistachio and the Pest by Marie-Louise Gay, translated by Jacob Homel“Summer vacation gets off to a rough start when Mom insists that Pistachio take her little sister Penny to the park. As she pulls Penny along in a wagon, Pistachio lets her mind wander off. Big mistake. Unsupervised, Penny pinches fruit from the grocer’s stand, wades in the park fountain, and climbs over a wall into scary Mrs. Oldtooth’s garden. What could possibly make Pistachio volunteer for babysitting the next day? A little exaggerated for dramatic and comic effect, the story is nonetheless enjoyable, while lively ink-and-watercolor illustrations brighten every page. This early reader book continues the broad theme of sibling relationships that runs through Gay’s work from the Stella and Sam picture books to the Travels with My Family middle-grade series.”

School Library Journal falls in love with Princess Pistachio and the Pest

Posted on July 6th, 2015 by pajamapress

Princess Pistachio and the Pest by Marie-Louise Gay, translated by Jacob Homel“It is the first day of summer vacation, and Pistachio has big plans with her friends. There are caverns to explore in the cemetery! But Pistachio’s plans are thwarted when her mom tells her she must take her baby sister Penny to the park instead. A grumpy Pistachio and an exuberant Penny, wearing a superman cape and bunny ears, no less, head off to the park—and a series of mishaps happen along the way. This entertaining transitional reader is perfectly suited for children ready to try chapter books. Translated from French, the text is rollicking and descriptive, offering strong vocabulary words such as careens, ecstatic, and flabbergasted. Gay’s pen-and-ink illustrations are awash with soft watercolors in blues, purples, and warm yellows, allowing Pistachio’s orange hair to pop off the pages. Penny is the perfect complement to Pistachio—full of energy and a daredevil side that keeps her big sister on her toes at all times.

VERDICT Fans of other high-spirited girl characters like Junie B. Jones and Clementine will fall in love with Princess Pistachio.”

Through the Looking Glass reviews Princess Pistachio

Posted on July 6th, 2015 by pajamapress

Princess Pistachio, an early reader by Marie-Louise Gay“Young readers are going to love this amusing chapter book, which introduces us to a girl who is sure that she is a princess who is being raised by the wrong family. It is amusing to see how Pistachio deals with her naysayers, and how she learns that there are actually more important things in life than being a princess.”
—Marya Jansen-Gruber

Click here to read the full review.

“Young readers…will once again be thrilled”—CM Magazine Highly Recommends Princess Pistachio and the Pest

Posted on April 24th, 2015 by pajamapress

Princess Pistachio and the Pest by Marie-Louise Gay, translated by Jacob Homel“…Young readers making the transition to chapter books will once again be thrilled to read about the adventures of intrepid Pistachio and her lovable little sister Penny. The text is easy to read, but challenging enough to engage young readers who will definitely be able to relate to the action in the story. Gay’s narration is full of dynamic descriptions: ‘Pistachio stands there, like a statue, her mouth open and her cheeks burning red.’ (p. 23)
The illustrations provide a great deal of interesting information for readers as well. Readers are able to see Pistachio’s frustration and anger, Penny’s enthusiasm and joy, and their mother’s love for her children…

This book can definitely be used as a read-aloud for early emergent readers while fluent readers can read it themselves. Young readers and their teachers or caregivers will enjoy discussing many interesting topics while reading Princess Pistachio and the Pest, including family relationships, personal responsibilities, friendships, legal issues and stereotypes. Highly Recommended.
—Myra Junyk

Click here to read the full review.

Princess Pistachio “Charming” and “Funny”—Booklist Online

Posted on January 12th, 2015 by pajamapress

Princess Pistachio, an early reader by Marie-Louise Gay“Pistachio is overjoyed when a golden crown arrives by mail, along with an unsigned card that reads, “Happy birthday, my little princess!” She decides that her real parents are a king and queen who will be coming for her soon. Suddenly it seems less important to obey her “adoptive” parents or be kind to her little sister, Penny. Her snooty pretensions make her a laughingstock at school. But when Penny gets lost one night, Pistachio summons her courage (“a real princess is brave”) to venture out alone and find her sister. Gay, best known for the Stella picture-book series, switches gears to write for a somewhat older audience. This early chapter book may be shorter than most, but it vividly portrays the characters’ emotions in both the text and the many colorful ink-and-wash illustrations. Sometimes charming and sometimes funny, the story is as satisfying as its protagonist’s name: Pistachio Shoelace. The last page reveals the cover of Princess Pistachio and the Pest, the second book in Gay’s new series.”

CM Magazine Highly Recommends Princess Pistachio

Posted on November 21st, 2014 by pajamapress

PrincessPistachio_Internet“In Princess Pistachio, Marie-Louise Gay appeals to young readers making the transition to chapter books. The text is easy to read and full of engaging conversations between the “princess” and her family and friends. Her friends are brutally honest with her when she pretends to be someone she is not: “You are no more a princess than I am. What has got into you?” Young readers will definitely be able to identify with Pistachio Shoelace’s desire to be someone else while suffering through family responsibilities and obnoxious siblings…

…This book can definitely be used as a read-aloud for early emergent readers. Fluent readers can read it themselves. Princess Pistachio is a beautifully written and luminously illustrated book which will help children make the transition to chapter books. Readers of all ages will also be thrilled to learn that there will soon be a new Princess Pistachio book!

Highly Recommended.”

Click here to read the full review.