Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘animal-welfare’

Alohamora Open a Book gives Elephant Journey a 4.5 Star Review

Posted on December 8th, 2016 by pajamapress

ElephantJourney_Internet“Did you know an elephant’s trunk has more than 60,000 muscles? This is just one of many things I learned from this fantastic book.

Elephant Journey: The True Story of Three Zoo Elephants and their Rescue from Captivity by Rob Laidlaw is a great non-fiction picture book. That means it is a great book with true facts, but it reads like a story.

I give Elephant Journey 4.5 out of 5 Stars; to be honest that is a pretty impressive score from me. This book earned the high rating for its great illustrated pictures, shown above, and photographs, shown below, just before the index giving a more non-fiction layout kind of feel.

I actually really like the design of the book. I appreciate how the author and illustrator distinguished between the story and the nitty gritty details. The illustrated pictures tell the story of Toka, Thika, and Iringa, the three elephants and their journey out of captivity. The illustrations are beautiful. The real photograph section goes more in depth into how the elephants made the journey, how the elephants thrived after (there was a super sad part), fascinating facts about elephants, and why captivity is so hard on elephants.

Elephant Journey is a great book, and I see a lot of value in it….[F]rom a reading level, interest level, and collection point of view I think this book is best suited for 4th- 6th grade (boys and girls alike), but older students could benefit with reading it and writing persuasive papers around the topic of elephants in captivity….

All in all, it was a powerful, educational, and enjoyable book to read….

If you have an elephant lover in your life, or you want to learn more about elephants in captivity definitely check this book out.”

Click here to read the full review

Vegbooks does a double feature on Rob Laidlaw

Posted on August 6th, 2014 by pajamapress

No Shelter Here_PB“…Laidlaw has a no holds barred approach in conveying today’s world for dogs…He lightens the subject matter through his eloquent writing style and by interjecting anecdotes from young Dog Champions who are working to better the lives of man’s best friend.”

Click here to read the full review.

Sal’s Fiction Addiction reviews Cat Champions

Posted on November 20th, 2013 by pajamapress

CatChampions“…the best part of the whole book comes when Mr. Laidlaw describes the ‘champions’ in detailed profiles, for the work they do to ensure that cats are safe, well fed and loved…There are ideas galore that can be shared to help improve the lives of the many kittens and cats that are in need of help throughout the world. Just one of them might appeal to you and your family. Check it out!”

Click here to read the full review.

CM Magazine highly recommends Cat Champions

Posted on November 1st, 2013 by pajamapress

CatChampions“Laidlaw, author of No Shelter Here: Making the World a Kinder Place for Dogs, now provides a book that will empower you to help homeless cats…An index and resource guide (cat protection and information websites) can be found on the back pages. This book worked for me…

Highly recommended.”

– Tanya Boudreau

Click here to read the full review.

Waterloo librarian recommends Nix Minus One

Posted on October 21st, 2013 by pajamapress

Nix_C_PRINT_Nov13.indd“You will think about the characters in this book, even when you’re not reading. Animal lovers, especially, won’t be able to put it down.

Note: Nix Minus One is one of 10 works of fiction nominated in the White Pine (Grades 9 – 12) category for the 2014 Ontario Library Association Forest of Reading Awards.”

– Heather Woodley, a collections development librarian with the Region of Waterloo Library.

Click here to read the full review.

Quill & Quire calls Cat Champions “ideal” for cat lovers

Posted on October 17th, 2013 by pajamapress

CatChampions“Cats may have conquered the Internet, but every year thousands still end up homeless in shelters, sanctuaries, and feral colonies. Cat Champions is about some of the people – most of them kids – who dedicate their personal time, imagination, and resources to care for them.

The book starts with a brief overview of Felis catus, or the domestic cat: its social, physical and behavioural characteristics, as well as various breeds. This section also profiles some unusual felines, such as the Hemingway cats, a colony of six-toed kitties that roam Ernest Hemmingway’s historic home in Key West, and the inhabitants of Japan’s famous cat islands, who vastly outnumber human residents.

In addition to those interesting tidbits, Laidlaw offers practical information about what to consider when adopting a cat, what makes a good shelter, the pros and cons of kittens versus adult cats, whether to allow your cat outdoors, and the truth about declawing. The author also suggests considering a cat’s colour – black cats tend to be adopted less often (a phenomenon known as Black Cat Syndrome) because of enduring myths that they are evil or bring bad luck.

The highlights of this book are the profiles of the cat champions themselves. Readers may be inspired to take action after learning about kids like Harley Helman of Ohio, who had the idea of collecting blankets for shelters and rescues when she was only eight, or 17-year-old Kieran Zierer-Clyke, who socializes feral kittens in his Toronto home to prepare them for adoption.

Written in a clear unpreachy style and brimming with lovely full-colour photos, this is an ideal volume for any young cat lover who wants to take his or her passion a little further than simply clicking “like” on YouTube videos.” – Emily Donaldson, a freelance reviewer and editor in Toronto.

9-year-old Blogger reviews No Shelter Here

Posted on July 30th, 2012 by pajamapress

Lili, who blogs at Rescue Dogs the Movie, is nine years old—the perfect age to review No Shelter Here!

I just got this FABULOUS book from the library yesterday.


It’s called No Shelter Here. I LOVE IT! It’s very sad knowing what things are happening to dogs, but it just reminds you to give your dog extra love.

It also tells you about great websites to visit that have to do with Animal Welfare and Shelter Dogs.
With each dog problem it tells you about, there’s one story of someone who helps make the world a better place for dogs.

Thank you, Rob Laidlaw, for making the world a better place for dogs.

Click here to see Lili’s full post.

Review of No Shelter Here in School Library Journal

Posted on March 16th, 2012 by pajamapress

“Canine lovers will discover a broad array of topics useful for caring for dogs and becoming an advocate for their humane treatment…Children will come away from this book educated and inspired to become “Dog Champions””

- School Library Journal

Resource Links Review of No Shelter Here

Posted on February 24th, 2012 by pajamapress

“No Shelter Here: Making the World a Kinder Place for Dogs is written by Rob Laidlaw with illustrations and pictures from various sources. Rob Laidlaw has been an advocate for animals for over thirty years and has founded many animal protection organizations. In this book he describes how to find a new pet and how to care for your new best friend. He shares stories from around the world and talks about the negative things people do to their pets. Some pictures and stories can be mature content for younger children but show realistic situations. The author talks about being an animal champion and what people do to volunteer to help out dogs. The book contains an index and a glossary.”

Kirkus Review of No Shelter Here

Posted on February 7th, 2012 by pajamapress

“An informative and visually varied introduction to problems affecting dogs worldwide. In a short, colorful volume with sidebars and photographs on nearly every page, professional dog advocate Laidlaw (Wild Animals in Captivity, 2008) presents facts about how dogs live, provides an overview of the cruelty dogs face at the hands of humans and offers profiles of young activists who are working to better dogs’ lives. Readers who know dogs best as pets will find new information here: The author gives as much time to discussions of street dogs in Detroit and India and the working conditions of sled dogs as he does to the more familiar topics of dog adoption and caring for a canine pet. Dogs’ mistreatment in research facilities and at the hands of some pet owners is addressed frankly but gently, and photographs of cramped puppy mills or dogs neglectfully chained outdoors inspire pathos but do not depend on shock value. A few questions raised by the text go unanswered—the author insists that “dogs … are our friends—not food” but neither extends this claim toward other animals nor explains why dogs, in his view, are different. At just 64 pages, the book does not delve deeply into any individual topic, but a list of animal welfare websites points interested readers toward further information. A worthy overview that may well inspire readers to become “Dog Champions.”

View the Review Here