Pajama Press

Posts Tagged ‘africa’

Children’s Books Heal calls A Good Trade an “important book”

Posted on October 29th, 2017 by pajamapress

AGoodTrade_Jacket_Aug28.indd“Alma Fullerton’s text is rich, spare and beautifully crafted. Her narrative is strong and lyrical as she shares Kato’s daily trip to get drinking water for his family…. This important book shows children how difficult life can be for kids living in war-torn areas and in drought….It addresses tough issues in a hopeful and age-appropriate manner and is an excellent read-aloud for the classroom. Karen Patkau’s digitally rendered illustrations are colorful and lush. They work beautifully with the text and illuminate the message in the story.”

Click here to read the full review

ETFO Voice says “In a Cloud of Dust demonstrates kindness and the idea of paying it forward”

Posted on October 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

homecover-in-a-cloud“Fullerton notes that in Tanzania and other parts of Africa, there are still millions of people who cannot afford transportation….Some NGOs donate bicycles and open bicycle libraries where children can sign out a bicycle. In a Cloud of Dust lists organizations in North America that donate bicycles to Africa….Learning more about these organizations and doing fundraising in your classroom could be great book extensions for intermediate students.

In a Cloud of Dust demonstrates kindness and the idea of paying it forward. The message in the book is terrific and can be embedded throughout the curriculum, specifically focusing on equality, citizenship and social justice. This book would be appropriate for junior and intermediate levels.”
—Lindsay Freedman is a member of the Peel Teacher Local

Read the full review on page 46 of the Fall 2017 issue of ETFO Voice

Community Soup is wonderful for young readers looking to explore their culinary side” says New York Botanical Gardens

Posted on August 26th, 2017 by pajamapress

Community Soup by Alma FullertonCommunity Soup is a short fun tale that welcomes everyone, including goats to join in making the community soup! You too can join in by following the Pumpkin Soup Recipe at the very end of the book. Alma Fullerton uses bright colors and texture in excitingly visual collages throughout the book. Each page comes alive and pops right off the page! Community Soup is wonderful for young readers looking to explore their culinary side with a little help from Kioni and her friends!”

Click here to read the full review

Omnilibros calls In a Cloud of Dust “a simple, uplifting story about sharing”

Posted on July 31st, 2017 by pajamapress

homecover-in-a-cloud“Glowing oil painting in golds and oranges spotlight the simple, uplifting story about sharing. An author’s note highlights more information about bicycle libraries and organizations that distribute bikes to Africa and other developing countries.”

Click here to read the full review

Oregon Coast Youth Book Preview Center highly recommends In a Cloud of Dust “to increase awareness of life in different…parts of the world”

Posted on July 20th, 2017 by pajamapress

homecover-in-a-cloud“…The bright, appealing illustrations carry the joy that the bicycles bring to the students through gold and orange washes, though specifics of the Tanzanian countryside are often lacking.

Verdict: Highly recommended for preschool, elementary and public libraries to increase awareness of life in different cultures and parts of the world.”
—Jane Cothron

Click here to read the full review

Publishers Weekly praises In a Cloud of Dust

Posted on June 30th, 2015 by pajamapress

homecover-in-a-cloud “Through the fictional story of a Tanzanian girl named Anna, Fullerton (Community Soup) and Deines (Bear on the Homefront) reveal how bicycles can change the lives of children whose families lack access to motorized transportation. Opening on “a little schoolhouse [that] sits at the end of a dusty road,” Deines shows Anna working indoors at a desk. “There will be no daylight for schoolwork by the time she reaches home,” writes Fullerton. A truck from a “Bicycle Library” unloads several bikes, but none are left for Anna; undeterred, she helps her friends learn how to ride their bikes (“She directs Samwel around the obstacles/ Left/ Right/ Stop!”) and shares one of them with another student so both of them can get home quickly. Soaked in warm golds and oranges, Deines’s oil paintings glow with a sense of promise as the children race around the schoolyard on their bikes. Fullerton says quite a bit with few words in her verselike prose, and a detailed author’s note discusses the vital role bicycles play in communities across Africa and supplies information about bicycle donation organizations. Ages 4–up. (Sept.)”

A Good Trade reviewed by author Andrea Mack

Posted on February 28th, 2014 by pajamapress

AGoodTrade_Jacket_Aug28.indd“This book is a good example of how spare language and imagery can highlight social issues in a way that young children can understand. I’d read this book again to study how the author uses words to create compelling images. The illustrations evoke a strong sense of atmosphere, as well as providing more to think about in showing details of Kato’s life in Africa.”

Click here to read the full post at That’s Another Story.

Sal’s Fiction Addiction enjoys Community Soup

Posted on November 14th, 2013 by pajamapress

CommunitySoup_Med“It’s lovely for young readers to catch a glimpse of village life in Kenya. The sentences are short and tell their story with a lively pace. The textural cut paper and collage illustrations add a lovely touch, and will invite close attention to the happenings in the village as the communal soup is prepared. Bright backgrounds match the brilliance of the children’s attire and the soup recipe shared at the back had my mouth watering…it is that time of year for the comfort it brings…”

Click here to read the full review.

A Good Trade is featured on Perfect Picture Book Friday

Posted on September 30th, 2013 by pajamapress

“Patkau’s bright illustrations originally caught my eye. I grabbed this lyrical book to teach my children about a corner of the world they have no other way to experience. Fullerton shows life in this war-torn part of the world in an age-appropriate way.”

– Kristin W. Larson

Click here to discover the recommended activities to teach this book.

Click here to see the full list of Perfect Picture Books.

School Library Journal praises A Good Trade

Posted on February 25th, 2013 by pajamapress

Gr 1-3–Kato, a young Ugandan boy, serves his family by filling jerry cans with a day’s worth of water each morning. His journey to the borehole takes him down hills, past cattle fields, and by soldiers standing guard. On this particular day, he pauses on his way back into town to peek inside an aid worker’s truck and sees that it is filled with shoes. While finishing his chores, he finds a white poppy in the field and picks it for the aid worker who gives the village children new shoes, the “good trade” of the title. The illustrations are bright and geometric, computer-generated but quite textural, appearing almost mixed media. The large images are full of subtle details that show the lifestyle and daily activities common in the small, lush village. The text is spare and poetic and the pictures capture the tone and supply the bulk of the information. Young readers will enjoy this sweet day-in-the-life snapshot.—Jennifer Miskec, Longwood University, Farmville, VA