Pajama Press

Little Fox, Lost was the “perfect solution” for The Reading Castle

Posted on November 16th, 2016 by pajamapress

LittleFoxLost_Website“Moving to the US wasn’t as big of a culture shock as we expected. Well, at least not until the results of the presidential election came in… We live in the liberal Pacific Northwest, so life is not so different from rainy Germany. After Finja was born I realized that education and upbringing in the US definitely is different from childhood in Germany though. One example: Stranger danger. Even with a policeman as a dad, my sister and I never were explicitly warned about strangers. Not because we were distrustful by nature, but it seems as if our parents were just not afraid of some outsider would come and swipe us away. I thought this was a generation conflict – after all I pedaled my bike through the dark woods when I was middle school aged. You can’t compare the 80s and 90s with today, can you? But speaking with my parent friends in Germany made me realize that it’s only not a question of generations – it’s a question of culture as well.

So with a naturally friendly and outgoing daughter I thought it was time to tell her about not wandering away (she loves to do that!) and not trusting anyone she doesn’t know – and even be careful of people she knows. But how can you do it without inflicting distrust and fear of other human beings?

I didn’t search for Nicole Snitselaar’s ‘Little Fox, Lost’, but it was the perfect solution to our problem….

‘Little Fox, Lost’ is a gentle story about getting lost and finding your way home again. We loved the snowy winter setting and the cute forest animals as well as the significance of the story – the illustrations by Alicia Padron are calming, they have a huge part in talking about a difficult topic without being frightening. Mother fox’s rhyme ‘If you ever are lost my child’ is easy to remember for children every age. This little ear worm can give them confidence if they should ever get lost for real….”

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