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Archive for the ‘Kiss Kiss’ Category

Kiss, Kiss is a Valentine’s Day book suggestion from Village Living Magazine

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

KissKiss_Website“Looking to get in the mood for Valentine’s Day? Kiss, Kiss is the perfect pick for this time of year—or any time at all. The simple prose will make you feel the magic…The vibrant cover art and delightful pictures will invite you into this lovely story. Warning: you may feel inspired to pull you little one in for a smooch.”

Read the full review on page 28 of the February 2017 issue of Village Living Magazine

Six Pajama Press titles featured in the Spring 2016 edition of Best Books for Kids & Teens

Posted on May 20th, 2016 by pajamapress

We are thrilled to announce that six recent Pajama Press titles have been selected and featured in the Spring 2016 edition of Best Books for Kids & Teens:

Ben Says Goodbye | Sarah Ellis & Kim La Fave | Pajama PressBen Says GoodbyeSTARRED SELECTION
978-1-927485-79-8  Hardcover with dust jacket
Written by Sarah Ellis
Illustrated by Kim La Fave

ElephantJourney_LR_RGBElephant Journey: The True Story of Three Zoo Elephants and their Rescue from Captivity
978-1-927485-77-4  Hardcover with dust jacket
Written by Rob Laidlaw
Illustrated by Brian Deines

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama PressKiss, Kiss
978-1-927485-86-6  Hardcover with laminated case
Written by Jennifer Couëlle
Illustrated by Jacques Laplante


OnceUponALine_LR_RGBOnce Upon a Line
STARRED SELECTION
978-1927485-78-1  Hardcover with dust jacket
Written and illustrated by Wallace Edwards

Timo's Garden | Victoria Allenby & Dean Griffiths | Pajama PressTimo’s Garden
978-1-927485-84-2  Hardcover with laminated case
Written by Victoria Allenby
Illustrated by Dean Griffiths

 

A Year of Borrowed Men | Michelle Barker & Renné Benoit | Pajama PressA Year of Borrowed Men
978-1-927485-83-5  Hardcover with dust jacket.
Written by Michelle BarkerIllustrated by Renné Benoit

 

Visit the Canadian Children’s Book Centre website to order your copy of Best Books for Kids & Teens today.

 

Best Books for Kids & Teens is your guide to the best new Canadian books, magazines, audio and video for children and teens. Whether you’re stocking a bookshelf in a classroom, library or at home, every title in this guide has been given the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s stamp of approval – See more at: https://bookcentre.ca/publications/best-books-for-kids-teens/#sthash.AOfcMJ4N.dpuf
Best Books for Kids & Teens is your guide to the best new Canadian books, magazines, audio and video for children and teens. Whether you’re stocking a bookshelf in a classroom, library or at home, every title in this guide has been given the Canadian Children’s Book Centre’s stamp of approval – See more at: https://bookcentre.ca/publications/best-books-for-kids-teens/#sthash.AOfcMJ4N.dpuf

Kiss, Kiss,/em> is “…a sophisticated and amusing…little book [with] wide appeal…”–Montreal Gazette

Posted on March 9th, 2016 by pajamapress

KissKiss_WebsiteKiss, Kiss, by Montreal’s Jennifer Couëlle was first published in French as Le bisou. Translated by Karen Simon, it retains a cheerful breeziness; simple rhymes describe the various types of kisses and how they can brighten a person’s day—or night (“Good-night kisses on the head. / Hugs before we go to bed,” accompanies a page that shows dad tucking his kids into a bunk bed). The colourful art of Montreal’s Jacques Laplante—whose simple lines and distinctive graphic style is both sophisticated and amusing— gives this little book wide appeal, although the publisher aims it at ages 3 to 6.

Click here for link to original review.

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Resource Links praises “sweet and simple” Kiss, Kiss

Posted on December 22nd, 2015 by pajamapress

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama Press“This very sweet and simple tale describes many types of kisses in a language very young children will understand and appreciate—e.g. ‘You can do it once, or twice. 100 times is very nice.’ Each type of kiss illustrates the different varieties of relationships to parents, grandparents, pets etc., found in a small child’s life.

The carton illustrations are cheerful and warm with touches of humour. The story is good for babies and toddlers.”
—Isobel Lang

Kids’ Book Buzz: Reviews by kids, for kids

Posted on November 17th, 2015 by pajamapress

Kids’ Book Buzz is a website where children’s books are reviewed by their intended audiences: kids! Here’s what they had to say about some of our latest titles.

Kiss, Kiss

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama Press “This book is very nice because it shows you all sorts of nice kisses. Kisses show someone that you love them, and some kisses are long, and some are short, some are loud and some are wet. This shows people kissing, and dogs kissing, and birds kissing, and even fish kissing. But it isn’t sloppy or gross, because the pictures are just little cartoon pictures. Some of the words rhyme but it isn’t really a poem and there aren’t very many words. I like the pictures where the mom or dad is giving the child a kiss, or the grandma. There are lots of hearts because the kisses show love. Sometimes a mom might give a kiss to help her child feel better if he got a scraped knee, and sometimes a kiss is to say hello or goodbye. Then at the end it says “I Love You!”

You will like to read this book because the pictures are really fun with lots of colors and funny animals and kissy lips. Maybe you will give this book to someone you love.”

Reviewed by Liesel, Age 4

Princess Pistachio and the Pest

Princess Pistachio and the Pest by Marie-Louise Gay, translated by Jacob Homel“A little girl named Pistachio wants to explore a cave with her friends, but instead, her mother wants her to take her little sister to the park. Pistachio thinks that is going to be so boring. First, she gets accused of being a thief, which is so embarrassing. Then, she falls into a witch’s garden and almost gets turned into a toad. Worst of all, she gets kicked out of the park because a warden thinks she meant to take money from the fountain, but it was her little sister, Penny. Everything terrible that happened that day was all Penny’s fault. But it was not boring. When she tells her mother what happened, her mom decides to call someone to look after them, since it’s too much for Pistachio. She calls the witch!  Pistachio is horrified. Even though she hated her day with her sister, she tells her mother not to worry. She’s sure they will have fun together.

I really liked this book. It’s hilarious, and it’s a short chapter book with pictures. It’s very exciting too. No book could be boring with witches, police, and thieves, especially not this one.”

—Reviewed by Paloma, Age 9

Once Upon a Line

OnceUponALine-COVER-FAKE-FOIL_RGB_500px“Once upon a Line is like no other book I have ever read. There really isn’t a story written, but instead you need to use your own imagination to finish off a story. Each page is a different picture and story for you to make up. They said the pictures were from a Great-Uncle George, who was a magician and had a magic pen. They say that every picture starts with a line and you need to find the line in each picture, as well as find the magic pen.

Once upon a Line was a great book. I liked looking for the starting line and magic pen on every page. I loved sitting with my mom and sister and we each took turns continuing the story for every picture. Some stories were easy to continue and others were harder. The illustrations were very detailed, colorful and some where really funny. My favorite page was the prince who dreamed in color and dreamed up a dragon. It was really fun making up your own story and using your imagination.”

—Reviewed by Jewel, Age 7

Giraffe Meets Bird

Giraffe Meets Bird by Rebecca Bender“There’s this giraffe that meets this bird. The bird was in its nest, in its egg, and when it hatched, giraffe saw it, because Giraffe is so tall. Giraffe thought the bird was cute and nice when he saw it, and Bird and Giraffe both learned what the other one liked, and had to learn to be nice. But they didn’t always get along, because sometimes they didn’t like what the other one did. Bird didn’t like Giraffe telling him what to do, and Giraffe didn’t like Bird bonking his head. So then they didn’t seem to like each other. But then when there was trouble coming, they went into this tree and helped each other because they were friends.

I liked this book because I like looking at the pictures, and there are fun things to look at in it. I like the part where the lion family comes and where the giraffe jumps into the tree. I was glad that Giraffe and Bird decided to be friends, even though they didn’t always get along. The pictures are really nice. This is a good book about being good friends.”

Reviewed by Liesel, Age 4

Bad Pirate

Bad Pirate by Kari-Lynn Winters and Dean Griffiths“Bad Pirate is about dog pirates that think being a pirate is about being saucy, bold, and selfish. The captain’s daughter, Augusta, is kind, nice, and helpful. Her dad and the other pirates think that is very, very bad. Augusta finally tries to be selfish, and then when there is a storm, her selfish act puts the whole ship in danger. So, she goes to help fix the sail, even though its not her job, and when her dad growls at her, she has to get saucy with him. Will he get mad at her? Will he let her fix the sail or will he let the ship sink? You have to read the book to find out!

Augusta is brave because she stands up to her dad, and is kind even when he tells her she should be selfish. I like this book because it was cool. I love pirates, and I like all the different characters. I really like all the details of the illustrations, they look like real dogs. And I like all the different breeds. I also like the ship. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes pirates, or wants to be nice, even if sometimes their friends aren’t.”

—reviewed by Lily, Age 6

Kirkus Reviews praises Kiss, Kiss

Posted on November 4th, 2015 by pajamapress

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama Press“A rhyming celebration of kisses of all kinds. Kisses can do so much: from sending love and healing boo-boos to saying hello and goodbye and good morning and good night. And then there are the kinds of kisses: wet ones, big ones, pecks, slurpy ones, and the ones that leave lipstick marks behind. ‘When grownups kiss it may look sappy. / Well, they’re in love—and very happy.’ While Couëlle’s verse changes rhythm and rhyming pattern on a whim (and not all of it rhymes), this matches the flighty topic of love and kisses (and also may reflect the fact that this is a translation of Le bisou from the French). And Laplante’s simple illustrations, which appear to be digital, are similarly whimsical, more rough sketches with color that often extends beyond its lines. A full range of relationships are represented here—parents, grandparents, couples, friends are all happily smooching. And people are not the only kissers in these pictures: fish and birds kiss, and a baby shares kisses with a dog. ‘Because a day without kissing / has something missing.’”

Publishers Weekly celebrates Kiss, Kiss

Posted on October 30th, 2015 by pajamapress

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama PressCouëlle and Laplante celebrate kisses, be they big or small, quick or “slurpy.” Both the writing and artwork have a sweetly haphazard quality—Laplante’s scraggly illustrations look authentically kid-drawn, the meter of Couëlle’s verse varies wildly, and she sneaks in a few extemporaneous unrhymed moments. “Some kisses make noises: big ones like… smooch! And little ones like… peck!” she writes as a startled dog’s ear raises in alarm while a doting grandmother kisses her granddaughter’s forehead. Whether kisses are meant to mitigate soccer injuries or signal hello or goodbye, Couëlle and Laplante make it clear that “a shower of kisses never misses.”

Click here to read this review on the PW website

Kiss, Kiss “a wonderful gift book”—CM Magazine

Posted on October 23rd, 2015 by pajamapress

Kiss, Kiss | Jennifer Couelle & Jacques Laplante |Pajama Press“…Couëlle’s gentle reminders of the magic of kisses are simply and poetically rendered on each page. The story, though translated from French, still holds a slight charming rhyme.

Jacques Laplante’s illustrations are the perfect mix of vibrant colour and black lines that enhance the playfulness of Couëlle’s story. Laplante’s artistic style is reminiscent of Quentin Blake, with messy pen strokes and dashes of bright hues. The artist aptly chose a lot of red and pink tones throughout the drawings which amp up the feeling of being surrounded by love. Laplante’s fun illustrations wonderfully accent Couëlle’s verse.

Jennifer Couëlle’s Kiss, Kiss is a book that should be read to remind listeners of how loved they are, as well as how powerful a kiss can be. Kiss, Kiss would also make a wonderful gift book, whether to a child, friend, or significant other—no matter who the reader may be, the ultimate message of the story will not be lost: love is important.”
—Nikita Griffioen

Click here to read the full review.