Pajama Press

Archive for February, 2017

French Toast gets a positive review from The International Educator

Posted on February 21st, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light. …Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

Youth Services Book Review says All the World a Poem “makes poetry accessible to all children”

Posted on February 21st, 2017 by pajamapress

AllTheWorldAPoem_Website2What did you like about the book? The whimsical illustrations set the tone for this fantastic first book of poetry for young children. The assumption in this book is that if all the world is a poem, than anyone can be a poet. This book makes poetry accessible to all children and shows children how much fun poetry can be. Some of the poems, rhyme; some don’t. It’s not so much a book of poems, but a book about poetry that includes poems.

Anything you didn’t like about it? I liked everything about it.

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This would be perfect for an early elementary literacy class where a teacher is introducing poetry. It is a non-threatening way to make all children realize that they can be poets with little effort….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? Yes”

Click here to read the full review

Sal’s Fiction Addiction says Waiting for Sophie is a “timeless story”

Posted on February 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

waitingforsophie_website“[Sarah Ellis] constantly writes strong stories that have lasting impact for her audience. Many remain on my ‘keepers’ shelf to now be shared with my granddaughters….

In this early chapter book, she introduces us to Liam and his family. Upon meeting him we learn that his parents have gone to the hospital in hopes that baby Sophie will soon arrive. Liam is super excited, but wants everything to happen now!…

Sarah Ellis tells another timeless story with beautifully chosen text and Carmen Mok matches the tone of the story perfectly with gentle images and soft colors….”

Click here to read the full review

My Beautiful Birds “is a tale of sorrow and suffering and promise” says CanLit for LittleCanadians

Posted on February 17th, 2017 by pajamapress

mybeautifulbirds_website“In My Beautiful Birds, author-illustrator Suzanne Del Rizzo offers a poignant story of a Syrian child refugee traumatized by leaving his cherished pigeons behind. It is a tale of sorrow and suffering and promise, and beautifully rendered in Suzanne Del Rizzo’s distinctive art….

The sadness and trauma in this little boy’s life is so palpable, from the family’s departure to their adjustment to the refugee camp and to the despondency that permeates Sami’s new life. Through use of colour and the texture of her art–here polymer clay with acrylics–Suzanne Del Rizzo balances the shadows of war and trauma with the bright colours of youthful exuberance and pastels of hope for a future. There’s the tumultuous skies and the ordinary days, and the anger of loss with the chirpiness of birds and children at play. I know the excellence of her art, complex in the depth of detail and its ability to evoke emotions. But Suzanne Del Rizzo has demonstrated a new depth to her writing. Perhaps it’s the tragic circumstances of the story but Suzanne Del Rizzo has put heart and hope into her words, giving breath to a staggering situation, suffusing it with some degree of optimism where there is so little. My Beautiful Birds provides a promise that all the darkness from that Syrian skyline of smoke is behind Sami and remains open to a bright sky of birds and lightness, the landscape of his future.”

Click here to read the full review

Good Pirate “is a great read aloud book” says Youth Services Book Review

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

GoodPirate_WebsiteWhat did you like about the book? Written in the jargon and accent of a true pirate, this book is a great read aloud book that will keep young children entertained. The illustrations are large and colorful so children hearing this book at a story hour in a library will be able to see the pictures with no problem. This is a story of a pack of dog pirates who are off to plunder and pillage. One of the crew, the captain’s daughter is an unlikely pillager as she is more concerned with more frilly things. When she saves the day by rescuing the rest of the dogs from the mangy pirate cats, she shows how clever a frilly pirate can be….

To Whom Would You Recommend this book? This is recommended for ages 5-8. Children who love pirates and have read the “Bad Pirate” book will love this book.

Who should buy this book? This would be good for elementary school libraries and public libraries that have a children’s section….

Should we (librarians/readers) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?  yes”
Sandra Pacheco, ESL teacher, Washington, D.C.

Click here to read the full review

CM Magazine recommends Under the Umbrella for it’s sense of rhythm and pacing

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

undertheumbrella_website“I have always enjoyed reading rhyming text out loud to groups of unsuspecting story time children as the atmosphere of the story unfolds in a rhythmic manner and comes alive when I do. The pace and anticipation of the story is set through the author’s clever ability to create the mood with simple words. The dark mood of the man in the story is felt by the quick and short sentences within the rhyming text, and it seems to become more urgent with every step that he takes through the stormy streets of Paris. When the worst of all things happens and his umbrella is blown from his hands, the man encounters a young boy who transports him to a better place, a place that is bright and warm where the rhythm of the rhymes has changed the atmosphere to illustrate a luxurious longing for the treats in the shop window….

The writing and illustrations in this book complement each other well and work together to highlight the special moment that the two characters share. One could say that they are in the calm of the storm before heading back out to continue their day. This story can be read with a group or shared with one child quite successfully….

Recommended.
Tamara Opar

Adrift at Sea is featured on Booklist Online

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

AdriftAtSea_website“In this picture book for somewhat older readers, Ho narrates the story of his perilous escape from postwar Vietnam, in 1981, describing his pain at leaving behind loved ones and relief upon being rescued by an American aircraft carrier after six days adrift on the ocean. The text is terse and unembellished, leaving the rich images to capture the emotional events. Photographs of the family bookend the story and remind readers of the events’ reality.”

Click here to read the full review

Elliot is the first picture book Sal’s Fiction Addiction has read that deals with the foster care system

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

Elliot_Website“Not all children are born into families where their needs can be met. There are many reasons for that. Perhaps the parents are too young, too inexperienced, incapable of providing the monetary support needed to help a child grow and flourish. Whatever the reason, there are times when children must be placed in foster care to ensure their growth and well-being….Honest and heartfelt, this book about foster parenting and adoption is a needed addition to any collection. Told in clear prose, with cut paper collage art done in quiet tones, it reflects the experiences of many children. I have not read another picture book dealing with the foster care system.”

Click here to read the full review

The International Educator gives French Toast a positive review

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

FrenchToast_Website“When you are blind, you don’t see skin color and you truly know that everyone is the same. Phoebe doesn’t like it when kids from school call ‘Hey, French Toast!’ or tease her for her accent. Her Nan-ma is blind and asks Phoebe to describe the colors of family and friends. Their talk helps Phoebe to look at things in a different light.…Phoebe discovers that Nan-ma doesn’t even know her own skin color until she tells her it is like maple syrup. Suddenly being called French Toast isn’t so bad anymore…”

Read the full review on page 40 of the February 2017 issue of The International Educator

Kiss, Kiss is a Valentine’s Day book suggestion from Village Living Magazine

Posted on February 13th, 2017 by pajamapress

KissKiss_Website“Looking to get in the mood for Valentine’s Day? Kiss, Kiss is the perfect pick for this time of year—or any time at all. The simple prose will make you feel the magic…The vibrant cover art and delightful pictures will invite you into this lovely story. Warning: you may feel inspired to pull you little one in for a smooch.”

Read the full review on page 28 of the February 2017 issue of Village Living Magazine